Author Topic: General Nutrition - Article 1 of 3  (Read 4774 times)

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July 28, 2006, 02:15:03 PM
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Big Boss

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Thanks for reading my first of three articles on physical health. I was inspired to write this because of a previous lengthy post on the subject of health.

That post is here at, http://forums.vsociety.net/topic/8167.15

Anyway, it is my personal belief that Mental health and Physical health are mutual partners in total health. One cannot be fully practical without the other. You cannot be fully focused on the physical, without a clear and clean mind, and you cannot fully focus mentally on something without an ideal physical persona. So, for that reason I decided to write some articles on physical health. This first one will deal primarily with reaching an ideal state of physical health, or at least, and improved state of health, for many. The second will deal with weight loss, and the third will deal with weight gain, at least, that's the plan for now.

I would just like to state that I am NOT a professional on the subject, and you SHOULD consult a physician before starting any new diet or exercise regimen. However, I feel this is rather well researched through personal experience, school classes, and the wealth of knowledge on the subject I found on the internet.  :)

With that, read on, apply, and hopefully you'll gain a new outlook on health. First up will be a somewhat lengthy explanation (sorry) on foods, then some application.

Let's start with the basics. What is a diet? Dictionary.com states:

diet
di·et1
n.

   1. The usual food and drink of a person or animal.
   2. A regulated selection of foods, as for medical reasons or cosmetic weight loss.
   3. Something used, enjoyed, or provided regularly: subsisted on a diet of detective novels during his vacation.

and Webster's New World Dictionary states

di-et n.
  1. what a person or animal usually eats or drinks
  2. a special or limited selection of food or drink, chosen or prescribed as to bring about weight loss


Now, personally, I prefer the first of those definitions. A diet to me, is a way of life. Trends and fads set by the diet industry have created a new definition for diet, where you "realize" that a diet is temporary. Personally, I think a temporary diet is a failed diet. To create a lasting effect on your health, your diet has to last.

Carbs

Today's natural enemy is the carb. Well, two years ago's natural enemy. Low-carb diets are fading slowly, but still exist. I'm ahead of myself though. What is a carb you might ask?

A carbohydrate is a chain of molecules commonly refered to as a starch or a sugar. They are broken down during digestion into simple sugars (glucose) and that fuels the body. There are at least four calories per carbohydrate, and the absorbtion of those calories is determined by two things, that are sortof one thing if you think about it.

Glycemic index and complexity: There are two types of carbs, simple and complex. Simple carbs are things like refined sugar, whereas the complex carbs are like... whole wheats and potato starch. Practically all simple carbs have a high glycemic index. The higher the glycemic index, the faster the sugar enters your blood stream. That's why drinking a soda will have an almost immediate effect on your energy levels, cause it goes straight into your blood stream. That's also why you will feel groggy and hungry a short time afterward, because since all the sugar is immediately in the blood stream, you run out faster, and you end up tired. Complex carbs can have a low or high glycemic index. Potatoes and breads tend to be on the high glycemic side, but beans and brown rice are considered low glycemic foods. The difference between high and low indexes is the amount of fiber you find in the food. Pure sugar has no fiber, so it is absorbed faster (pure sugar is also a simple molecule so it breaks down faster, where complex carbs are broken down slowly because of their compelxity. Fiber + complex molecules makes for a rather slow break down, resulting in lasting energy.) Brown rice and beans are loaded with fiber AND carbohydrates, (and protein in the case of beans. More on that later.) which make them very good foods to ingest. yum food.

To sum that up:
"Good" Carbs - high fiber, complex carbs with low glycemic index resulting in steady, long lasting energy
"Bad" Carbs - no fiber, simple carbs with high glycemic index that make your blood sugar fluctuate dramatically.

okay, on to Fats:

There are two basic types of fat, saturated and unsaturated. There is also trans fat (I guess that is today's health enemy, and for good reason)

Here is a rudimentary drawing of saturated fat:

>-ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo-<

And here is monounsaturated fat:

>-oooooooooooooooo--ooooooooooooooooooo-<

last, here is polyunsaturated fat

>-ooooooooooooo--oooooooo--ooooo-ooooooooooooooooooo----oooooooo-<

(trans fat is like a big tangle, so I won't explain that one in drawing form :))

(the REAL molecular structures can be found at http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/qatrans2.html#s1q5

Let's compare fats to a brick wall, and your digestive system to a hammer. Saturated fats are a solid brick wall. no cracks, no loose bricks, no easy way through, you have to chip at it for a long time to break through.

Monounsaturated fat is like a brick wall with a missing brick, so you can have a place to start, a weak spot to target.

Polyunsaturated fats have multiple missing bricks and cracks, so they are easier to break down.

Fats in general do not break down easily in the digestive system. They are necessary to provide fat-soluble vitamins (more on that later) and aid in hormone production. yay, hormones. However, Saturated fats and trans fat raise LDL (bad) cholesterol levels. When all of that is combined you get coronary heart disease. fun stuff I bet.

To sum up fats:

Eat foods with little or no saturated/trans fat. Limit fat intake in general, but do not eliminate it.

Protein:

Protein is an interesting substance, and I've had more descriptive confusion over protein than any other macronutrient (carbs and fats) I've been told that protein cannot be used as energy, I've heard that it cannot be stored as energy, I've heard that it builds up as fat, I've heard that too much can lead to heart problems, I've heard that too much can lead to osteoporosis. Even through research, I'm still a little confused, so here is what I know for... sure...

Protein is essential. Proten is good. haha, okay, there is more to it than that. Protein builds muscle and repairs cells and such. If it is not used for those reasons, it is converted to fat, and stored in tissue. In a very roundabout way, I suppose it can be used as energy if you start to break down the fat that it was converted to, but that would require you to starve yourself for a few days after eating nothing but steak. I am unsure at this point what kind of fat the protein is converted to. I'll let you all know when I figure it out.

There are a few dangers of high protein diets. *Atikins rant time MWAHAHAHAAAA*

The problem with low carb diets is that they focus on eating meat instead of breads and such. Most meats are high in saturated fat and cholesterol. You will feel full after eating less, and you will stay full because your body will be trying to break down the protein for a long time. The result is a little energy supplied over a long period of time. It's similar to the complex carb idea, but with less energy to go along with it. Proteins take twice the effort to break down than carbs, so you can assume that you get half of the energy. Most people drop out of the diet after six or so months anyway, and you end up gaining back tons of weight because your body will adapt to storing the few carbs you DO ingest, so when you hit yourself with a couple hundred carbs, you don't feel so good...

Supposedly, if you are not endurance training for a sport, too much protein will impair the heart and force it to work too hard. Not sure on that one, but keep it in mind. Also, too much protein and not enough carbs , will cause some sort of reaction to the calcium in your body, and you will lose calcium through your urine. This can lead to osteoporosis in later years.

Sum up of protein:
It's necessary and good. :)
Don't take too much, especially if you're avoiding carbs for some... odd reason...

Sum of Macronutrients (carbs fats and proteins.)

50% carbs
30% protein
20% fats
10% awesomeness (gotta give 110% :))
 :cow: <-- too much saturated fat
 :dog: <-- popular in some countries. lean meat.
 :elephant: <-- radioactive. don't eat
 :teethy: <-- eats you.
complex carbs, unsaturated fat, and moderate protein depending on your exercise regimen.

Vitamins:

Vitamins are micronutrients, meaning, you don't need much of them to get by, but you do need them, because your body can assimilate them on it's own (with a few exceptions)

Probably the most important vitamins are C, E, and the B vitamins, but A, H, K, and P are all important as well. Minerals are good too.

If you are eating well, you most likely will not need to take a supplementary vitamin mixture, but it probably wouldn't hurt because very rarely does a vitamin or mineral overdose cause harm. The worst things to OD on are iron and potassium I think.
Here is a site with all the precautions and usages. http://www.vitamins-nutrition.org//vitamins-guide/index.html

The only thing to remember about supplements is that you CANNOT absorb the vitamins without food. Take them with something diverse, with a little fat and carbs and protein. maybe some stirfry or equivalent meal.

Exercise:

I was taught in school that 30 minutes 3 times a week of exercise was good enough. I'm gonna toss out the BS flag on that one. 30 minutes is some people's warm up! I don't feel like I've exercised unless it's at least over an hour, and even then, 20 minutes of rest and I'm good to go again. I personally recommend more than 30 and 3. Shoot for that if you don't exercise at all. If you already exceed that, then you are either in pretty good shape or you are in training for something. I think for simple health benefits and personal improvement, go for 45 to 60 minutes of exercise two days, then skip a day, then two days, then skip a day. Perhaps skip two days at this point and restart your week. Vary your workout to avoid boredom. Remember also, that almost anything can be exercise. Jump on your trampoline, or your neighbors trampoline, like all my friends did with mine. Climb a tree, swing a stick, flip out, play a drum set, wail on your air guitar (strangely tiring I might add). Do SOMETHING!! You'll feel better (endorphins) and you will have more energy (elevated blood flow).

Sample diet and exercise:

Morning - some eggs with whole grain toast and orange juice. Oatmeal is great here too.
Lunch - tuna fish sandwich. There is alot of protein in tuna, and it is low in fat. if you dont' like tuna, make either egg salad sandwiches or chicken salad sandwiches. sandwiches rock. also throw in maybe some potato salad or mac and cheese. A regular salad will do well too, but avoid really fatty dressings.
Dinner - brown rice with diced asparagus and tomato. If you want some meat, chop up some ham or turkey and throw it on top. It's practicaly stir fry, but don't fry it. avoid the grease and butter.

Keep in mind that recent studies have shown that 5 small meals tend to be better for you than 3 big ones. So any of the above can be divided and redistributed.

At some point during the day (two hours or so between meals.) do your exercise.
Start with a walk around your block, or up and down your apartment stairs. Get your heart rate up, but don't get all sweaty for a warm up, just get pumped. Then maybe go for a light jog, or do some punch and kick sets in the air. Tai-bo is cool, and Budokan, but I haven't tried that one yet. Looks good though. Throw in some push ups and crunches and leg lifts. Try not to work one muscle group to strenuously for days in a row, you may get weaker. For instance, if you do 100 crunches and 100 leg lifts every day, and you aren't ready for it, you may find you can only do 90, then 80, and you'll just be wearing yourself out. If this happens, give your abs a break for a few days, and work other parts of your body. Change it up often! For a cool down, stretch really good and go for a walk through a park or something. Don't just stop and go all comatose on yourself, that will lead to cramps the next day and you'll be so unpleasant you might give up your new diet, er, way of life, without really giving it a shot.



Whew, I think that's it for this article. I hope everyone can gain at least SOMETHING from it. It is quite possible that I made some errors, so give me some feedback if you find such problems.

Stay Tuned for my next article.  :P

vitamin links:

   http://www.realtime.net/anr/vitamins.html

   http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/stay_healthy/food/vitamin.html

   http://www.vitamins-nutrition.org//vitamins-guide/index.html

definitions:

   http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/diet

carbs, proteins, and lipids:
   
   http://www.webmd.com/content/article/61/67547.htm
      good carbs, bad carbs
   http://www.webmd.com/content/article/92/101603.htm
      net carbs
   http://www.webmd.com/content/article/82/97293.htm
      carb facts from zelman
   http://www.webmd.com/content/article/85/98824.htm
      protein info
   http://www.acefitness.org/fitfacts/fitnessqa_display.aspx?itemid=272
      good protein risk info

Cholesterol:
   http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=1516
      good and bad

Dieting:

   http://www.webmd.com/content/chat_transcripts/1/108693.htm

   http://www.webmd.com/content/article/82/97293.htm

balanced diet:
   
   http://www.purchon.com/biology/diet.htm
      not bad
   http://www.homehealth-uk.com/index.html?f=body|fr=http://www.homehealth-uk.com/medical/healthybalanceddiet.htm|r
      rather detailed, perhaps biased though
   http://www.annecollins.com/nutrition/balanced-diet.htm
      simple straightforward

Exercise:
   
   http://www.acefitness.org/fitfacts/fitnessqa_display.aspx?itemid=272

   http://www.hoptechno.com/book11.htm

Update: Hech recently gave me info on some newer studies that in a few cases, contradict what I've said. The most notable difference is that these studies provide evidence that a high protein diet is better for you in a number of ways. His post in it's entirety is easily accessible, just scroll down a ways, but for what I think was most relevant, I've decided to post it right here.

Quote
Essential fatty acids (Omega-3) are considered to be good fats. You can buy Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Flax Seed Oil which are essential sources of these "good fats". Good fat will not necessarily make you fat - as long as your diet is calorie-conscious and nutritionally balanced.

Good fat will actually help you lose your unwanted body fat - if you keep the total of fat well within the total daily calories you need burn every day. Essential fats in the right proportion of your total calories consumed can actually augment the metabolic processes in the body the help you get and stay lean.

Protein requirements for human populations have been based almost entirely upon nitrogen balance studies.[3] Yet many protein metabolism experts now acknowledge that this method is seriously flawed.[1-3] The nitrogen balance technique overestimates nitrogen (protein) intake and underestimates nitrogen losses. This is due to the difficulty in assessing nitrous gas losses after colonic microflora, nitrogen losses through the skin (urea) and expired air (ammonia) and the nitrate content in food and urine which is not measured.
In light of these important facts, several protein metabolism experts (scientists that have devoted their careers to this area of research) have recently urged health care professionals to change their restrictive views on protein intake.[2] These protein specialists recommend that since we know so little about the functions of various amino acids at both the mechanistic and quantitative level, to make restrictive recommendations on protein intakes for healthy, active people is intellectually unsatisfactory.[2]

Recent scientific evidence on physically active individuals indicates that regular exercise increases daily protein requirements by as much as 100%, that’s double the RDA.

High protein intakes do not harm a healthy body. Several studies demonstrate that protein intakes (up to three times the RDA) cause no harm to healthy people.[1-4] In fact, protein intakes above the RDA appear to enhance health. Excess protein and amino intake is shown to be harmless in healthy people. Therefore, to ensure results from intense training, it is a far smarter strategy to consume more protein than to senselessly restrict protein intake.[2]"

(1. J. Nutr. 130:1868S-1873S, 2000.)
(2. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 5:43-45 2002.)
(3. J Am Coll Nutr. 19;5:513S-521S, 2000.)
(4. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 5:63-75 2002.)

"Increasing the ratio of protein in a calorie-controlled diet is now considered a safe, effective strategy that lowers blood lipid concentrations and improves insulin/glucose metabolism to provide better fat loss. French scientists have recently identified another reason why a high protein diet is much more effective for controlling hunger during calorie-restricted diets.

(Cell Metabolism 2; 321-329, 2005.)

Recently, Brazilian researchers have shown that when rats were fed a diet that contained more protein and less carbohydrate, short-term changes occurred in fat cell metabolism. That is, the enzymes responsible for fat synthesis in cells actually decreased. However, as soon as the rats returned back to a normal diet that was high in carbohydrate and fat (and lower in protein), enzyme activity returned to pre-existing levels.

(Can J Physiol Pharmacol 83; 477-482, 2005.)
« Last Edit: September 20, 2006, 04:03:51 AM by Martial Thoughts »
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July 28, 2006, 06:08:32 PM
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NathanE

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Heh 30 minutes is my lunch break then I go back to lifitng heavy stuff and having to run and dodge traffic. :-P road commision rules. Other then that your job may bring undue stress and or toxins IE Second hand smoke from co workers, Vehicle smog and work related injuries(I am counting psychological as an injury also..)
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July 28, 2006, 09:21:50 PM
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Big Boss

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well, any change that someone could make to bring about better health seems like a good thing. true you can't eliminate all outside sources of unhealthy substances, but that's life I guess.

you could always bring a sack lunch too  :cool:
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August 25, 2006, 08:16:49 PM
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Elfscout5892

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Some towns are eliminating smoking inside for the benifit of people with respritory problems, not to mention that secondhand smoke kills more people than getting it right from a cigarette does.
"Every day, man is making bigger and better fool-proof things, and every day, nature is making bigger and better fools. So far, I think nature is winning."
-Albert Einstien

September 07, 2006, 01:20:04 AM
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sargon

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Nice article  :wink:

Have you ever researched colon cleansing? It's not necessarry if you've been eating healthy and exercising though.

September 10, 2006, 08:16:10 AM
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Big Boss

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I've never heard of colon cleansing... unless you're referring to the odd practice I heard the other day where you let a mouse crawl up your anus, then you wait for it to die and you pull it out by the string you previously tied to the mouse before letting it crawl up your anal pore. hopefully nobody shoved a mouse up there without reading the part about the string first...
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September 18, 2006, 05:40:47 PM
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Hech

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I was seriously way to bothered to read through the whole thing, and even more bothered to comment on everything, though I do congratulate you on writing this...people really need it :-\, but I will say this:

1.) Fats are extremely essential and can actually help you lose fat, depending on the profile.

2.) There is nothing wrong with high protien diets, anything else you hear is a myth or old science. The more protien, the better, I doubt you'll get enough to harm you. I'm 165 lbs and 5' 10" and I need about 300 grams of protien for growth.

3.) More carbs than protien? No way. Carbs are extremely essential, and it is certainly needed to ensure that you take low-GI level carbs (and this also helps to avoid diabetes), but you don't want to take more carbs than protien. Low carb is bad, more carb than protien is bad, high protien is good.

4.) Actually, 30-45 minutes of weight training is optimal. Any longer and you start impeding your growth and blunting GH level spikes, you also start hitting some serious muscle catabolism and like things. 40ish minutes allows extremely high intensity with high results, along with the least amount of drawbacks. Additionally, for about two hours after this period your body should consume a large amount of your daily caloric intake.

5.) If you're doing cardio, 15-20 minutes is best, as it allows you to work to your maximum intensity on your circulating glucose levels without hitting catabolism and spiking your resting metabolism levels. You don't burn fat during long term excersise, in fact, you'd probably burn a lot of muscle. The real time you lose weight is during the day. Look at the long distance runners, skinny and no muscle. Look at the sprinters, lean and muscular.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2006, 05:42:54 PM by Hech »

September 18, 2006, 10:40:26 PM
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Big Boss

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although I respect your opinion and concerns, I find you hard to believe when you don't show a shred of evidence to your claims, something I did generously. you also said you didn't read the entire article, so please, if you're going to rant about how wrong I am, at least take the time to really come up with what it is I was wrong about, something you can't really do unless you verify yourself by reading.
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September 19, 2006, 05:19:02 AM
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Hech

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Whoa whoa whoa, I'm not trying to shoot you down and scream about how wrong you are  :eek:   That was not my intention at all, I apologize. I do appreciate that you made this thread, and you really did put a lot of good information into it. Like I said, at the moment I didn't have the time nor patience to read through the entire thing, delicately write a post concerning every aspect, and then list tons of scientific references to my responses. I can see how you would want them obviously, however, so I'll put them in I suppose, when time permits (which should be within the day or something). Sarcopenia (the age-related loss of muscle mass) costs the United States health care system at least 18.4 billion dollars every single year - so they've started to do a LOT of research on it. That means there is a lot of new information out there on body building (I'm a body builder), muscle, and general health. Body building isn't just recklessly lifting tons of weight and building useless muscle, its a multi-faceted sport that involves everything from fat loss to bone density.


EDIT: Is there anything specific that you would like references for or more detail on? Or would you rather me forget the whole thing, keep my mouth closed, and leave it be?
« Last Edit: September 19, 2006, 05:24:34 AM by Hech »

September 19, 2006, 05:36:48 AM
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Big Boss

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I want info on points 1 through 3 of your post. 4 and 5 I won't argue against cause I myself didn't do extensive research on that area. all I know is that personally, I can't get enough exercise in 45 minutes.

but yeah, in eveything I read, carbs should dominate your diet, as long as they're accompanied by fiber, because carbs are the best source of energy for the body.

fats are important, they create hormones and help the nervous system and there are a number of vitamins that can only be absorbed if accompanied by fat. I didn't say get rid of them, just don't eat so much saturated fat.

and on the protein thing, many articles I read stated that protien is more difficult to break down than carbs, so they aren't entirely useful for that reason. powerade has experimented with adding protien to their drinks, but many of their scientists fear that it will hinder water absorbtion. and I read somewhere else (I don't have sitable sources for these two points, I apologize) that too much protein if you are not exercising regularly can impede the heart.

I'm sorry I seemingly snapped, I just think we both misunderstand eachother. my article was written just to improve the daily diet, not to revolutionize it or turn everybody into body builders. I'm 5'8" and 125 pounds. I don't need 300 grams of protein a day to stay healthy or maintain my weight.
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September 19, 2006, 05:55:02 AM
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Hech

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*laughs* Ok


EDIT: I'm still pretty busy, so I just decided to copy/paste some stuff that I found on my computer. Just some basic information that is a bit more detailed. I'll get to the fact that I mentioned low-GI causing diabetes and I guess anything else I mentioned in a second.

Fats:

"Essential fatty acids (Omega-3) are considered to be good fats. You can buy Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Flax Seed Oil which are essential sources of these "good fats". Good fat will not necessarily make you fat - as long as your diet is calorie-conscious and nutritionally balanced.

Good fat will actually help you lose your unwanted body fat - if you keep the total of fat well within the total daily calories you need burn every day. Essential fats in the right proportion of your total calories consumed can actually augment the metabolic processes in the body the help you get and stay lean.

Essential fatty acids are essential nutrients for people who workout on a consistent basis or a hard training athlete. This good fat starts the process of creating all other fatty acids and hormone precursors needed to build lean muscle.

Essential fatty acids actually play a very important role in your body's functions. Essential Omega-3 fatty acids are ultimately converted in the body to hormone-like components that regulate every biological process. In fact, there are over 1,000 biological actions of essential fatty acids. Some of which include affect smooth muscle, regulate reflexes, manufacture hormones, help in the body's immune response building healthy cell walls, transporting oxygen to the body cells, keeping saturated fat moving in the blood stream, and is the number one energy source for the heart muscle.

Recent studies have discovered that up to 20 percent of the population show an undetectable amount of Omega-3 in the blood levels. That's not good. It is hard, however, to get some of these fats, and apart from supplimentation, getting CLA is very difficult unless you eat a lot of kangaroo meat (I think?). [sic]"


Protein:

"The reason for the controversy surrounding protein requirements for building muscle originates from misinterpreted scientific literature on this extremely complex topic. Many health care professionals and nutritionists do not have a sound knowledge of the analytical measures used to assess nutritional requirements. Most professionals do not examine the methodologies used in the research studies they base their recommendations upon...consider the following.

• The current laboratory measures used to assess protein requirements are not concerned with optimizing health.[1-3]

• Assay techniques designed to measure the effectiveness of a protein such as the protein efficiency ratio (PER) measures the ability of a protein to support weight gain in young, rapidly growing rats. It’s taken the medical community about 70 years to realize that the PER method only reflects the amino acid (protein) requirements for growing rats, not humans, and definitely not athletes.

The new “protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score” (PDCAAS) is even more misleading than the old PER. The PDCAAS gives any complete protein the same rating of 1.00. This rating system makes the job of selecting the right protein to optimize muscle growth from training extremely difficult, if not down right impossible.

• Protein requirements for human populations have been based almost entirely upon nitrogen balance studies.[3] Yet many protein metabolism experts now acknowledge that this method is seriously flawed.[1-3] The nitrogen balance technique overestimates nitrogen (protein) intake and underestimates nitrogen losses. This is due to the difficulty in assessing nitrous gas losses after colonic microflora, nitrogen losses through the skin (urea) and expired air (ammonia) and the nitrate content in food and urine which is not measured.
In light of these important facts, several protein metabolism experts (scientists that have devoted their careers to this area of research) have recently urged health care professionals to change their restrictive views on protein intake.[2] These protein specialists recommend that since we know so little about the functions of various amino acids at both the mechanistic and quantitative level, to make restrictive recommendations on protein intakes for healthy, active people is intellectually unsatisfactory.[2]

Recent scientific evidence on physically active individuals indicates that regular exercise increases daily protein requirements by as much as 100%, that’s double the RDA.

High protein intakes do not harm a healthy body. Several studies demonstrate that protein intakes (up to three times the RDA) cause no harm to healthy people.[1-4] In fact, protein intakes above the RDA appear to enhance health. Excess protein and amino intake is shown to be harmless in healthy people. Therefore, to ensure results from intense training, it is a far smarter strategy to consume more protein than to senselessly restrict protein intake.[2]"

(1. J. Nutr. 130:1868S-1873S, 2000.)
(2. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 5:43-45 2002.)
(3. J Am Coll Nutr. 19;5:513S-521S, 2000.)
(4. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 5:63-75 2002.)

"Increasing the ratio of protein in a calorie-controlled diet is now considered a safe, effective strategy that lowers blood lipid concentrations and improves insulin/glucose metabolism to provide better fat loss. French scientists have recently identified another reason why a high protein diet is much more effective for controlling hunger during calorie-restricted diets.

These scientists showed that when rodents were fed a high protein diet, blood sugar was maintained via production in the intestines. In turn, this process appeared to trigger enzymes in the liver that switch off hunger signals. This response was confirmed when the scientists reversed this effect by severing nerves that supplied liver blood vessels."

(Cell Metabolism 2; 321-329, 2005.)

"High-protein diets have been extremely popular among many health-conscious groups. This is due to an increasing amount of research that suggests high-protein diets provide a number of health benefits such as stabilized blood sugar levels, improved cholesterol profiles, reduced appetite, preservation of lean tissue and more effective fat loss. However, some physicians are still concerned about the safety of a high protein intake over the long term.

One of these concerns is the effects of a high protein diet on kidney function. The kidneys are responsible for eliminating the waste products of protein metabolism. However, a recent, conclusive review of the scientific literature on this topic has shown that high-protein diets have little or no effect on kidney function."

"Several well controlled studies have shown that people build more muscle and shed body fat easier when they increase the ratio of protein to carbohydrate in their diet. Aside from the favorable influence on fat loss hormones such as insulin, one explanation for these benefits may be due to changes that occur within the cells themselves.

Recently, Brazilian researchers have shown that when rats were fed a diet that contained more protein and less carbohydrate, short-term changes occurred in fat cell metabolism. That is, the enzymes responsible for fat synthesis in cells actually decreased. However, as soon as the rats returned back to a normal diet that was high in carbohydrate and fat (and lower in protein), enzyme activity returned to pre-existing levels."

(Can J Physiol Pharmacol 83; 477-482, 2005.)
« Last Edit: September 19, 2006, 06:25:37 AM by Hech »

September 19, 2006, 06:25:53 AM
Reply #11

Hech

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September 19, 2006, 02:59:27 PM
Reply #12

Big Boss

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thank you for that. I've never heard many of these ideas and I will edit my article accordingly. I'll also probably come to you for my next article. :)
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September 19, 2006, 08:12:34 PM
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Hech

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*laughs* Well I'm no expert, I'm just dedicated. I'm sure we could learn things from each other :)

September 20, 2006, 04:04:54 AM
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Join my Folding@Home team and do some good! #159490

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