Author Topic: Choosing a new Martial Art  (Read 5214 times)

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August 15, 2005, 03:44:50 AM
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Velocity

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Okay. All of my life I have been training in the methods of Martial Arts. Never a formal art, just picked up what I could from my Uncle, who studies many forms of Martial Arts/Qi Gong. Anyways, he moved, and is currently in the Far East. I have taken a look at the schools around the area I am living in currently, and it seems like my choices are Aikido, Kung Fu or Tae Kwon Do...

Tae Kwon Do is out the window, due to the fact its a tournament school...

The Kung Fu school is kind of turning me off, due to the fact that the pictures of the classes has a lot of people in them. Im not use to a large amount of people to train with, and in my opinion it takes away from the 1 on 1.

This leaves me with Aikido. Now, I know Aikido is a Defensive Art, with no strikes, just counters. I myself am only 5'8 and weigh 145-150. Im use to being mobile in combat, kicking, striking and what not. I have been pondering if taking up Aikido would be good for my body size.

What do you guys recomend. I am currently 17, about to be 18.. and would like to start getting more experience with traditional Martial Arts Concepts, wrather then what has been passed down from my uncle, from his various studies.

Any advice would help greatly..

-V-

August 15, 2005, 05:34:57 AM
Reply #1

Faijer

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I would take up both Aikido and Kung Fu. If you're used to a more striking based art then Kung Fu will probably serve you better in that aspect, regardless of whether the class is big or not (you'll still get taught and can still ask questions before or after the classes I would assume). But make sure it has sparring regularly, otherwise there's little point. Aikido is a good art, but it takes a while to really be able to make it practical and be able to use it in a spontaneous situation, but I would guess the class will be smaller (only because I've never seen a large class, I could be wrong) so it might be good for the more 1 on 1 training you want.
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August 15, 2005, 12:16:33 PM
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Fireblade

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As Talyn said: Taking both Aikido and Kung Fu would probably be the best BUT this depend on which style of Kung Fu we are talking about.
As for prefering smaller clases: the pictures are probably aranged to draw more practitioners to the class(make sure it isn`t a mac dojo).
It is often normal to divide large clubs into smaller groups, so you should check it out before you decide.

Most clubs offer a couple of free trainings before the sign you up.

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August 15, 2005, 01:24:15 PM
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Velocity

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I took part in an Aikido seminar last year, and my thoughts were just as Talyn stated. It will probably take a while for me to use this practically in a fighting situation. Another problem, is the money. Im not exactly wallowing in money, and I dont live with any parents, so it will all be on me to pay...

I've always wanted to study Kung Fu, so Im probably going to give the school a shot.

Hell, I'll take up the free lessons at both.

any more suggestions?

August 15, 2005, 02:24:05 PM
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Fireblade

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Kong Fu is a very broad term, if you can tell me what style they train I might be able to tell you more.

Other than that you just have to find out for yourself

Good luck
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August 15, 2005, 11:21:25 PM
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Mike187

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It really depends on what martial art you have taken before because different martial arts tend to lean towards certain aspects of a fight.  For example, karate tends to be more power oriented and in closer than say TKD or judo is the grappling part of the fight etc.  I myself am a shito-ryu stylist(karate) and I have taken wrestling and a tiny bit of kickboxing.  As a generalization, kickboxing for speed, wrestling for strength and grappling, and karate for strikes and the medium range fight.  Now what would make me a more all round fighter would be to take kung fu for fluidity, speed and a bit larger range and to take muay thai for the really in close fight (ie. elbows etc).  I personally  would love to learn kung fu althought I do not know what types there are because I know that even in karate some styles like gojo-ryu are more oriented towards pure power and strength or shotokan to hand techniques.  Whatever you choose it will be good for you as a fighter but always choose your dojo carefully.  Watch the teacher demonstrate the moves and seen as you have done martial arts before you should be able to evaluate the quality of the dojo on a few moves.  I find front kick is a good indicator as well as a downward block.  Anyways good luck in your new martial art.

August 15, 2005, 11:50:29 PM
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Velocity

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the style of the Kung Fu school is 5 Animal.


August 16, 2005, 06:14:45 AM
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Fireblade

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When you say that the school is 5 animal this may explain all and it may explain nothing.
If they teach five different styles of animal kung fu, then we are back at the begining again (which styles?)

If the style is named 5 animal this link: www.shaolin.com.au/animal.html
may be able to explain a bit about the style.

Other wise all I can think of conserning 5 animals is in Qi Gong, though I think I remember something about 5 animals in Hung Gar.
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August 18, 2005, 02:41:10 AM
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Velocity

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thank you for your help.

August 19, 2005, 07:57:37 AM
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Murray

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I'm taking up Aikido now (starting October), and am looking forward to it. I decided for Aikido because of all the mental and physical benefits (ki, relaxation etc), and because I think it will give me an understanding of motions and how to use them in a fight. I also believe it is ultimately, after many many years of practice, the best way to defend yourself, since you can end the fight quickly without hurting anyone more than neccesarily (but don't start a discussion on "best martial art"). I love grappling, as well as everything else concerning controlling your own and your opponents body, and if I hadn't chosen Aikido, I would probably have taken up Jiu Jitsu.

If I had been you, I would have taken both, but if money is a problem, both seem a good choice. It kind of depends on how much you want the "spiritual" part of martial arts.
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August 19, 2005, 01:56:24 PM
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I'd suggest Kung Fu; despite that the class may be large, you can always discuss things with your sifu that you are uncomfortable with (in this case the class size) and maybe he/she can plan out a day that less people come in on, or maybe even a private class if you're lucky enough =).
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August 19, 2005, 04:24:37 PM
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Spartan62

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Man, you guys have a lot of choice in your m.a schools there is a good tkd school I go to and a couple of crap brazillian jui jitsu schools, plus an Arnis class but you have to be 16 which I am not.  I'd take Kung Fu probably you should check the place out for a few classes first though.
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August 24, 2005, 11:57:05 PM
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Oblivion

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It all truly depends on you and what you want to do, a style usualy has tendencies and always has a base, be it power or kicks or fluidity. I myself am have just started brazilian jiu-jitsu, it is a simple stlye that utilizes movement, leverage, and you oppent not being to beat you because of simple overpowering. For example, 5'10" 140lb men can easily beat a 6'3" 220lb man from simple leverage. Also, one can defeat a person with out having to cause any real damage. It is a very effective style against strikers because it closes the range needed for a strike. The striker no longer has the leverage or ability to make too many effective stikes, most strikes are even useless. I like it and I find it fun, it's also great because if you face an opponent of equal skill, a single match may last 30 or more minutes, great for building indurance and stamina. I don't know everything about it, but its a good simple style thats pretty easy to learn in my opinion.
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September 05, 2005, 09:03:13 AM
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Go with the kung fu.  :biggrin:
« Last Edit: September 05, 2005, 01:32:06 PM by Akhilleus »

October 04, 2005, 10:52:36 AM
Reply #14

Velocity

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well.. Thank you all for your help...

But, it really sucks when you cant study a martial art because you dont have money lol.

Oh well. If anyone is in the Seattle, Washington area, and would like to train me... lol lemme know.