Author Topic: My views on Fighting Psychology  (Read 5418 times)

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June 14, 2004, 07:26:42 PM
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Enlightenment

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ok, this is one of the things my summer's training has been focused upon, the mindset of training.  I will not be on often now, because my training has *finally* begun, but I will pop in every once in a while, to post articles like this, and to state my views, who knows..even talk in the chat once in a while before my training is up ^_^.

anyway, here goes..

                          Psychology In The Fight

                                    By: Zakk Brown, aka Enlightenment


   Now I am sure when reading the title alone, you think..."Psychology, in a fight?  You gotta be kiddin' me!"  Nay, I kid you not.  Fighting is 70% mental, and only 30% physical, another shocker I am sure to many.  But, it is true, however much you wish to deny it, fighting is much more mental than it is physical.  Do not believe me, then try fighting someone as if all you did were throw punches and just let your emotions and such fly free.  I am guarunteed you would find yourself in predicaments such as getting paralyzed with fear the moment a real battle ensues, or just having doubt in your abilities.  This is something that is not optional, you CANNOT allow yourself to fall victim to these common instinct factors when it comes to self defense.

   You could have learned from the highest shaolin monk, you could learn virtually every skill and had gotten a blackbelt in everything there was a blackbelt (or sash) for.  And still, if you hadnt the proper mindset training, you would fall to practically anyone.  This is a common problem for the current day martial artist, because despite however much love you may have for the martial arts, nobody, and I mean nobody wants to get their asses kicked, sorry, it's just a fact.  Nobody wants physical harm brought onto them in a sittuation in which they have to defend themselves.

   The mindset is key, and I cannot stress this enough.  But, what exactly can one do to ensure they keep the mindest, and aren't just working on something they'll lose sight of the second their dukes go up?  Well, the answer to that is simple, yet hard to comprehend for many.  All I can say is, you just have to do it.  There is no other way around it.  If you read this article, or even opened it up, that shows that you have some interest in the psychological aspects of self defense, which means you *do* want this, even if only to a miniscule degree.   So then, if you want something, you can attain it, granted it is not a crazy goal.  A crazy goal, mind you is trying to do a Dragonball Z-type attack (e.g.- the attacks when they scream like they're trying to shit their pants, then shoot a big lazer beam out of their hands, mouths, eyes, whatever.), a power up, trying to fly, etc.  etc.  THOSE are crazy goals, and if you have those, then you obviously aren't mature enough to grasp the concepts I am trying to teach to you.

   I say trying, because not everyone *can* and/or *will* grasp it, some wont, some will think I dont know what I'm talking about and some it just wont work for their style; 'work with their style'? what does that mean? you ask.  Well, some people's fighting style that works best for them is a crazed style (e.g.-drunken fist kung fu.) in which logic is purposely abandoned.  There is no need for logic in those styles because their strength is the lack of logic, they have the potential to throw a logical fighter off guard and then thrash them.  That is the goal of one of those types of art.  The ape style of kung fu is another example, however there is still logic in that style, to a relative degree of course.

   Anyways, back to the lesson I am trying to teach.  Psychology is a key point in a fight.  If you cannot keep a cool head during the fight, then what good is anything you learned, what good is any strength you built up, what good is any speed you built up, what good is *anything* you worked for in terms of self defense?  Nothing, that's what.

   All of that is worthless if at the moment you get struck you get scared.  Fear is a very, very bad thing to have during the fight.  It can paralyze you, almost literally to be honest.  If you get scared to a high enough degree, chills may shoot up your spine and you may find it hard to move out of the way of the strike even.  If this happens, you're Toast because then you fear your opponent, something that is hard to shake off or yourself.  Not to mention it boosts up their confidence, making it even harder to clear your mind long enough to forsake those thoughts of fear.

   Keeping yourself without fear of the opponent, wherever, homever they are at all times is good.  There is a difference between thinking rationally, and fearing things.  Fearing something, is bad for you because it is the act of being changed considerably psychologically due to the actions of another, when put into the context of a sittuation of self defense, anyways.  Rationally realizing there is a possibility of harm is a different thing, because that then you can work around to achieve your goal (e.g.- if your opponent has a knife, getting scared of it and giving into their will is fearing something; and rationally realizing the possibility of harm being at a considerable percentage, but still finding a way around it would be the proper approach.).  Fear enerally creates sittuations in which your problem seems 10 times bigger than it actually is.  If the person you're fighting seems so bad to you, and you just sit and think to yourself clearly, you will find that they arent as tough as they seem.  You then can rationally decide a way to deal with the conflict.

   For example, you enter a conflict and they throw a basic jab to your face level.  If you were fearful, you would probably hold your hands up and get scared, probably taking the full force of the hit.  As well as you would probably tense up, causing the hit to hurt even more.  If you had stayed calm though, you would see the shoulder's movement, to throw the jab, and put up your hands quickly.  You then would have pushed the blow over easily, and from there you could have done a reverse-wrist lock, and done numerous variations of combinations to that, one would be a shoulder grab linked to that reverse-wrist lock, then a knee strike to the groin area.  From there, you could take your other arm and dislocate their elbow, for it would still be in reverse-wrist lock.  From here, they would be clearly immobilized and you would no longer need to harm them.

   You get out, and they do.  The aggressor is harmed, yes but at least you are out safely.  In sittuations of self-defense, unless you are incredibly skilled, you will generally have to use intense pain as a negotiative skill.  For example, locking the leg when they try to kick you, in a painful lock so that they cannot move to resist, then saying "I'm going to break this if you dont leave me alone", chances are they'll be too startled to even think of harming you, should you release their leg.

   Anyway, now that I gave an example of how this is useful, I will begin to aid you in stopping yourself from getting these bad things to happen to you.  Before I begin though, I must warn you that you musn't mistake lack of fear for total fearlessness, for total fearlessness is stupidity at a high degree.  TOTAL fearlessness is basically thinking that nothing can harm you, and running into a car because you think you're tough enough to withstand it's impact.  A good degree of fearlessness, however is knowing there is a chance of harm, but not letting that get into your way, and logically finding a way around the car, if you absolutely have to get through.

   Now then, simply meditate upon this to begin with.  Meditate upon not fearing someone, and knowing that no matter how strong they are, no matter how fast they are, no matter how good their technique is, you can still overcome them, because you can.  Nothing is for 100% certain.  Does this mean you should get cocky about it and pick a fight with the captain of the high school wrestling team? probably not.

   What I am trying to teach you is to be modest in your abilities, to be confident yet humble.  You must only fight in defense, because doing so otherwise interrupts the delicate balance needed to succeed in having the right mindset to defend oneself.  If you are being thuroughly insulted, you must defend your pride, but on the same token you do not have to use violence to do so.  Only when you are being attacked, may you harm them.


   Once upon a time, in a Japanese bar
Three men were making rude comments towards their neighbor.
Their neighbor was known to be highly skilled in Iaido.
They wished to duel him, so they continued their verbal onslaught.
Until, the jokes got rather severe and deep-rooted.
The Iaido master, then quickly raised his chopsticks, and caught 4 flies by the wing.
He sat there, smiled and then released the flies.
The 3 men left scared, and shamed.
The Iaido master wasnt troubled by the 3 ever again.

   
   The moral of this story is that when being lightly insulted, you may ignore it, only when it gets to the point where it is severe, may you act.  And when you do act, act in a way that re-inforces your fierecness, and power; that makes them respect you, but so that you need not violence.  If they are still ignorant to your abilities, then ask them to stop, and if they ask you to force them to, then you do not.  If they throw a punch at you, then and only then may you strike back.

   Otherwise, you may as well stop reading now, and go off and continue being the crazed brawler street fighter type.  A martial artist who cannot see the wisdom in what I am trying to explain is no better than a stubborn brawler.  Anyone can punch, anyone can kick.  Anyone can learn an advanced system and anyone can gain physical strength.  Male, female; black, white, asian, latin; christian, buddhist, hindu, whatever.  Your differences matter not, you are able to accomplish all of this.  It is not something you are inable to do.

   One who can keep their confidence, yet not abuse their power is someone who surpasses one who beats them in any attribute of the fight, the 3 attributes of the fight include Speed, Power and Technique.

   If you can keep a cool head, then you may always find a way to outdo them.  Even if it is not there in front of you, maybe later on.  But it will come to you.

Losing this mindset is something that haunts, or has haunted every martial artist at one point or another, and if it hasnt yet, it will eventually.  This is just a common response to danger.  It is understandable, but it by no means, means we must accept it.  You cannot always make things go your way, but sometimes you can bend them a bit to add your own touch to them.

That is all for now, I hope you had enjoyed my writing, as I had enjoyed writing it.

Be Well.
En: Get into a class.
Preferably a Hatha Yoga class.
Avoid Yogas
Power Yoga, Fitness yoga, Wellness Yoga, Energy Yoga.....
What about NINJA SEX YOGA!!! Is that alright?
Tsu: No :P
ROFL

June 15, 2004, 04:30:21 AM
Reply #1

Faijer

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Nice Enlightenment. However unlike your other article, I knew everything here *glows with ego* except for that little parable about the Iaido Master.

A few things though:

I know a kind of person that desires pain - massachists. Massachism being the psychological disorder where someone feels pain as sexual pleasure. Although a very picky detail, I noticed you said "nobody, and I mean nobody wants to get their asses kicked" and the structure did not take into account these people. I know that I'm being incredibly picky with this, but I'm a perfectionist, lol.

Ape style? Do you mean Monkey style, or is there actually an Ape style? If so I haven't heard of it (though I can almost grasph what it would be like).

Overall I thought the article was very well structured and written, explaining it in a clear manner. Although I noticed that the only emotion you focused on was fear, when there are other emotions that can affect a fight negatively. I will quickly point them out for anyone curious (hope you don't mind Enlightenment)...


Anger (all forms): Next to fear this has to be one of the worst. Anger makes you tense up and lose your focus. Thought it does not paralyse you in the way fear does, the tensing up makes your techniques sloppy and almost useless. It is not that hard to remain calm and angerless in a fight so long as you remember that it can be controlled in a similar way to fear, just make sure you relax (take deep breaths, in through the nose, out through the mouth, using your entire lung volume, visualise all your anger flowing out as you breathe out, and new positive energy flowing in as you breath in).

Frustration (typified commonly as anger): Frustration usually comes when the opponent holds a superior mindset to your own and is managing to almost toy with you (or something to that effect). Although a lot of people put this under anger, it is not, though it usually leads to anger. The difference is that frustration, when not actual anger, wants to make you give up, rather than go crazy like anger does.

Doubt (sub-category of fear): This comes not when the opponent looks bad, but when you are lacking confidence in your own abilities. "Are my side kicks good enough?", "Are my punches strong enough?", "Will I be able to react in time?" This is not pure fear, but that said, it will quickly lead to is, so avoid this.

Other things that can be categorised are not emotions, but stray thoughts. Distractions for example, though they exist, should not be seen or heard, smelt or felt, as they will draw your attention from the fight, and when fighting, your full attention must be on the fight. These could include sounds, if you hear anything that is not from the fight (that might include the opponent's mates cheering him on), completely ignore it. If you see someone you know, ignore them, the fight is your focus. If you smell something you don't like (or do like), ignore it. If you feel a fly land on your face, or something tap you in the back of the leg (unless it's a wall or something), then put it out of your mind.

There are 3 components of a fighter (like Enlightenment said) - Speed, Technique, Power. There are 3 components of a fight - You, your opponent(s) and the floor/ring. Weapons are not an additional component because they are an extension of the body (and like arms, legs another other bodily parts, can be broken or removed).

I hope you don't mind these additions Enlightenment, if you disagree with any, please point them out, I just felt that fear wasn't the only emotion in a fight (through experience), and that some of the more specific things needed to be pointed out.
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June 15, 2004, 12:36:05 PM
Reply #2

Enlightenment

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no, no problem at all, Talyn ^_^.

actually, I was meaning to add those myself, with somewhat different wording of course; but still, you hit the nail on the head pretty well.

reason I forgot to? well..heh I was really tired at the time of writing it, but was inspired by some things I read from bruce lee; I had been wanting to write an article on this for a while but never could get what I /wanted/ to say onto paper, so to speak.

thanks though, you filled in the holes of my article.

Be Well.
En: Get into a class.
Preferably a Hatha Yoga class.
Avoid Yogas
Power Yoga, Fitness yoga, Wellness Yoga, Energy Yoga.....
What about NINJA SEX YOGA!!! Is that alright?
Tsu: No :P
ROFL

June 16, 2004, 03:32:32 AM
Reply #3

Faijer

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Glad to be of help, fighting psychology and philosophy is one of my specialties.
My WordPress Blog is updated regularly.
NEW UPDATE: Life begins at conception: A thought experiment (29/08/2012)

June 18, 2004, 02:45:37 AM
Reply #4

FRoST

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here is my 2 cents : i am not trying to argue or disprove anyone by saying this.   From my experience at the college football level which i am still playing in, it is all about no hesitating, throw a move out there, and instead of hopeing that it is going to work, if it doesnt work you have to be able to react and go to another move, and another point is to follow through, yea most Defensive ends can get by a 300 slow offensive tackle, if the de doesnt follow through and gives up his efforts are wasted.  So how is all this related to martial arts? same concepts wether it is sparring or a real fight, it is all about reaction, as the first post mention you can have blackbelts and whatever but if u dont react in the right way you could get k.o.  That why technique is so important it helps u more than one might think, once you are done a kick land in the right position and get rdy to block if he is coming at you with a move or follow through and throw a different kick or punch, one of the problems i have and alot of people at my dojo have is not following through, yea they threw a good kick but backing up away from the openent is not helping you becuase you both have a fresh start atfighting again.  Maybe this tid bit of information will help anyone out there who needs help and is reading this.  From football i have learned that experince is the best thing a player can have, but to obtain experience it means putting in extra effort on every aspect of your ability mental and physical, it means spending extra time in the weight room and watching film, it means asking questions and knowing how the game is played so you ask the right kinds of questions. I soon to be freshmen couldnt hang with our running program the other day, complaining that he was dizzy and rdy to throw up,  i realized that i was once at that point in my football career but now i know that i have to suck it up, my teamates depend on me, they are tired too, they are hurting as well, and as long as I hold the illusion that i am not tired the people in the same position i am in and are below me will be intimidated or discourgaed, thats what i try to do, say if you want to take my spot u are going to have to work for it.  Karate doesnt have "positions" like football, but it has more experienced practioners, yea someone know all these cool kicks and moves spinning or whatever, but somtimes you have to be realalistic and think that your common fighting isnt going to be in a wide open space like a dojo, in is most likely going to be in a bar in close quaters or croweded people. I guess my a point that i am trying to get a cross is that it doesnt matter what style you practice if you are not a disiplined martail artist you will be lazy and make mistakes, and that knock move might never been able to be used becuase of laziness,  Wether it is football or martial arts one needs to train ones body to its maximum potentenail. (sorry about the spelling i am on another lvl right now. One thing that i have learned from taking martial arts is that sports like basketball football baseball etc are only big in the media mainstream, it is were the money is, nobody wants to watch to people fight unless it is action packed kicking ass in a movie or somthing like ultimate fighting with lots of blood and more action.  Which brings me to another point that martial arts isnt respected by many people anymore, that is why we who practice should learn as much as possible so when younger people join the ideas can be passed to a younger generation.  A kid in my class is always smiling and luaghing, then when u see him do kata he is not doing it correctly becuase he is not as serious as he should be, i say this to remind the importance of serious and dedicated practice. Dunno why i am using football examples, partly becuase it proves that the nfl or college players u see on tv are good role models to follow but you dont see what they do to get there, so in martial arts, working out the body and flexibility along with mental aspects of it will make anyone a dedicatted martial artist. Lets see what all do i have to say, i have so many thoughts in my head and writing a big essay is a good way to get them out.  Another thing i have noticed is that most people who know nothing about martial arts think we are weird, weird becuase they dont understand, thats why all the dedication to the art can make people understand what martial arts is all about

if you read all of this congradulations lol
"If you run, you will only die tired!"

June 20, 2004, 03:17:20 PM
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Enlightenment

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yes, frost you made some very valid points in that post,and I agree wholeheartedly, one must think realistically when practicing the martial arts.  Your examples from football are very valid, although football is a game, and martial arts are just that, artistic forms of self defense.  I have told this to anyone who has asked me about my views on the fight, if you are looking to just kick some ass, then learn to street fight in about an hour or two from one of your buddies, that will get the job well done.  Also, if you seek to learn only to defend yourself, then take up a karate class or something of the sort, one of the better martial arts, yes better IMHO, such as Xingyiquan, Liu He Ba Fa, or any other styles; are not for you if all you wish to do is find a system of self defense, or just to beat someone up.

A better style requires dedication, a bit of thought put into the practice of, amongst other things.  Otherwise they would be no different from other styles.  Also, notice that I especially chose internal styles of kung fu , because the various styles of kung fu are superior to say...taekwondo, karate, ju jutsu, and many other more-so widely advertised MA's, IMHO of course.

I am embracing these, the ones in my other articles, and many others in the creation of my own martial art, it will not be ready to even speak much of for a long time, but I believe I will construct something totally new, yet highly effective and still grasping the intellectual concepts that I believe some arts have lost sight of; or rather the majority of practitioners.

also, sorry if my grammar is off, I'm at my uncle's place and am borrowing his P.O.S. laptop...which has a pretty bad keyboard, I may add.

that is all for now,

Be Well.
En: Get into a class.
Preferably a Hatha Yoga class.
Avoid Yogas
Power Yoga, Fitness yoga, Wellness Yoga, Energy Yoga.....
What about NINJA SEX YOGA!!! Is that alright?
Tsu: No :P
ROFL

June 20, 2004, 03:50:27 PM
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Faijer

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Enlightenment, I would like to talk to you sometime on MSN about the creation of your own art, because I too am seeking to try and create an art from several others. Perhaps more of an external art than what you seem to be going for. It will hopefully be a fusion of: Lau Gar, Wushu, Wing Chun and Aikido if I can manage to learn enough of them. I plan to try and make it public in about 13-16 years or so, but I would like to discuss this with you at some point.
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June 20, 2004, 03:59:47 PM
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qigongguy222

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you have no right to say that one style is  better then another. who are you to say that a shotokan karate guy could not beat a internal martial artist in a fight. it depends on the artist not the style.

June 21, 2004, 04:12:17 AM
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Faijer

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If you were to take two people of the same potential, and train them in the respective arts, the way the arts teach, for the same amount of time, and then pit them against each other, my money's on the internal martial artist. True that the artist makes the art, but generally that requires a half decent art to start with. Another example, in our area we have a Karate club called Sama Karate, and Falcon trained till he was a Purple Stripe (not far off brown and thus black), and had trained there for I think, 3 years, and as a White Sash at Kung Fu (about 2 years back), I could already beat him. The Sama Karate club in our area is absolute shite, I've seen them, and there's no way that 'the artist makes the art' philosophy applies indefinitely, because a crap art won't allow the person to expand to their full potential anyway.
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June 22, 2004, 09:21:59 AM
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Enlightenment

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Quote from: qigongguy222
you have no right to say that one style is  better then another. who are you to say that a shotokan karate guy could not beat a internal martial artist in a fight. it depends on the artist not the style.


*points to Talyn's post*

also, notice how I put IMHO (in my honest opinion) each time I said something was better or something was lesser.  Let it be known that I think so, because internal styles of kung fu, especially Liu He Ba Fa and Xingyiquan are quite more philosophical than most, and require more work put into them than just the average hour and a half to two hours most martial arts clubs allow per class.

In my opinion, a martial art should be more than just a way to defend yourself, it should have certain behavioral guidelines; and those lame-ass "school rules" that most McDojo's put up to attract parents do not count.  I have found that a calm mind, free of distractions (including bad emotions such as hatred, greed, anger, frustration, depression, thirst for revenge, doubt, etc. etc.)  is ESPECIALLY important in the internal styles of kung fu.  It is something you must really express in all areas of your life to prove effective.  One must embrace all aspects of his/her art to truly attain mastership of it, in my personal opinion as always.

And, yes I have the right to claim something is better than something else, that may be and in this case, IS my personal opinion.  Who am I to say?  I am myself, one who has a free spirited mind and choses to believe what I wish to believe.  If the art, as Talyn pointed out, is absolute shit..then of course (in my opinion) even if they have the best of physical training and meditative training, they will still get the living shit beaten out of them by an internal martial artist, why? because again in MY opinion the style itself is better than anything they could learn from..Shotokan, the style you described in your semi-pissed off post.

Liu He Ba Fa, in my view is 100x better than Shotokan could ever be.  Liu He Ba Fa, is far more philosophical than Shotokan, and focuses on instead of meerely creating a system of self defense; creates a fluent, beautiful artistic form of self defense, yet still stays practical in a street sittuation.  Liu He Ba Fa will and has worked on the streets, as has Xingyiquan; for me at least.  It's really all about how you keep your mind set.

If you go out, get into a street fight and think "hey, I'm a blackbelt in shotokan karate, I can kick this guy's ass no problem..he's a pussy!" and then one of your moves doesnt work, why? because most shotokan schools I have seen teach things like "if your opponent hits you with the right hand to the face, do this..yadda yadda yadda", and it doesnt work; instead you get hit in the face..then...you get frustrated BECAUSE your technique failed, and you try to hit them in anger, they dodge and you get hit a bunch more times..then you get more pissed off and keep trying to hit them, but keep hitting nothing but air...this goes on until you're either knocked out, you tired them out from them constantly kicking your can during the fight, or you run away...in either outcome, you have lost the fight, why? it wasnt because your style was bad, no it was because the way your style was taught was bad, as well as it had no philosophical attribute to it at all.  There was no "keep calm, a harmony of focused Yi (wisdom mind), and clear Xin (emotional mind) in a fight is key."; no, there was just "if your opponent does this, you do this..always" and you were stuck to THAT particular form.

as Bruce Lee has said, the ultimate shape is no shape.  If you are not confined to just one pattern of actions, then you will be able to adapt to your surroundings, much as water does *points to his article on water philosophy* ^_^.  By the way, I plan to revolve my style much around these principles of water.

Talyn:  Sure, anytime.  For now, I plan to spend the next 2.5 years (until I graduate high school) continuing my training in (I have spent 7.5 years in tkd and judo, and the rest I had just started months ago) Taekwondo, Judo, Liu He Ba Fa, Shoi Choi, Hung Gar, Southern Mantis, Xingyiquan; as well as wushu longsword, broadswords and pole forms I have been learning from my Sifu.

*Bear in mind I live in Ohio presently, a ways away from Chicago and far away from Seattle when reading the bit below*

From there, I plan to continue my training that I had learned for a year, whilst in Seattle..and hopefully locate a fairly good school(s) for what I had been training in; if nothing else, I have found a good Jeet Kune Do school that will keep me busy for the year I am there..  I have to stay in Seattle for a year to figure out some things, it's a long story.

From there, I plan to go to Chicago (I'll be 19 by then), and begin training under Grandmaster Wai Lun Choi for Liu He Ba Fa, Wushu and Xingyiquan; as well the college I plan to go to to get my pyschology and philosophy degree from offers a martial arts club, which offers tkd and judo amongst other arts, which is rather good, from what I had seen this past week (I was in Chicago, at my uncle's *points to previous post he made* for a funeral, so in turn I got to speak with Grandmaster Wai Lun Choi, as well as look into the college's clubs).

Once all that is done, I dont know where my training will take me, to be honest.  Although I never shall stop, even if I havent the money to continue learning, I can always find a way ^_^.

but..to answer your question more briefly, I plan to include my training in Liu He Ba Fa, Xingyiquan, Hung Gar, Wushu, Southern Mantis, Shoi Choi, Wushu, Tkd (only a few various kicks, none of the airy-fairy stuff.), Judo and Jeet Kune Do for the time being, although I am sure that I will find more to add onto my training whilst I create my art.

For now, I plan to simply call it "The Art of Water Style", a rather large work in progress.  I will discuss it with you on MSN messenger more indetail, of course.

that is all for now, I have *another* article to type up ^_^.  Which will be added here shortly.

Be Well.
En: Get into a class.
Preferably a Hatha Yoga class.
Avoid Yogas
Power Yoga, Fitness yoga, Wellness Yoga, Energy Yoga.....
What about NINJA SEX YOGA!!! Is that alright?
Tsu: No :P
ROFL

June 23, 2004, 11:10:23 AM
Reply #10

Teike

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My opinion is that you shouldn't start with arguments why another martial art is better. I think if you take 2 fighters who are very dedicated and at the same level, one karate, one chinese internal art, there wouldn't even be a fight. When you need to defend yourself on the streets against someone who did an internal art and uses it against you, he isn't dedicated and you lead the fight.

And if it is friendly sparring I think it is wrong to say that internal arts are stronger then karate and jiu jitsu. They are ment to be used different than an internal art. But they are equal to each other about how effective they reach their goals. I believe this is a misunderstanding of karate and japanese fighting arts because, on the movies, chinese external and internal kung-fu where always better.

Also I want to add that I believe in my art and do not disrespect your opinions because believing in your martial art is important.
"A man may give breadth to his principles: it is not principles that give breadth to the man" Confucius

June 23, 2004, 12:49:02 PM
Reply #11

Enlightenment

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indeed, but you cannot say that the internal styles are inadequate compared to external styles.  They most certainly are adequate.  You cannot judge a martial art until you have taken it yourself.  I have taken Shotokan Karate, and I take Judo, which is more or less Ju Jutsu..so I have formed enough of an opinioniative base to stake those claims.

I have used Xingyiquan in street sittuations before, and it has worked miraculously.  In fact, I would say Xingyiquan was and is more useful than any other art I had recieved trianing in, to me at least.

that's firstly,

Secondly, In my honest opinion, the various styles of Gung Fu (Kung Fu), are far more superior to those of karate and ju jutsu.  Considering that Gung Fu is the ancestor of karate, tae kwon do, ju jutsu and the many many other styles; I can wholeheartedly say that Gung Fu is better.  I believe that a martial art is not a martial art unless it is fluent in its movements, as well as practical.  Something *most* (not all) karate schools lack, in both areas mind you.  They will give techniques such as "if your opponent punches you this way, then you do this..blah blah blah"; but in a real life sittuation, this will not be useful in the least bit.  Real combat is unpredictable and fast paced, you cannot rely on rehearsed movement patterns to subdue your opponent.  As well, the fluidity of most karate styles I have observed is horrid.  There is no constant flow, in the katas, it is just punch, kick, kick, block, punch punch punch, kick..then return to original stance.  That kind of a formation is stagnant, as well as in my honest opinion useless.  There is no need for various formations, IMHO.  Instead just teach the movments, and make it practical.  Leave the students to decide how to use them in combinations.

That way it will work better for them, and after all that is why most people take up karate, for the self defense.  So, the fact that it lacks fluidity and practicality screams a bad message from that art.  Now I am sure there are good schools out there, although I have yet to see even one myself...

Be Well.
En: Get into a class.
Preferably a Hatha Yoga class.
Avoid Yogas
Power Yoga, Fitness yoga, Wellness Yoga, Energy Yoga.....
What about NINJA SEX YOGA!!! Is that alright?
Tsu: No :P
ROFL

June 25, 2004, 03:01:18 PM
Reply #12

Faijer

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Lau Gar, my current foremost style (2 years and 9 months, but about 5 years compared to most Karate), has a massive emphasis on sparring, which is probably the soul most important kind of practicing any Martial Artist can do, aside from actual combat, which may not be as good for learning anyway. Over the last 2.75 years, I've steadily advanced in my skills and can now block about 70%% of my instructor's attacks and get a few hits in each one minute round. Before I started Lau Gar, I had done several Martial Arts already, including a year of Shotokan Karate, which became the basis for some of my personal training later on in life (my Karate Instructor was a good one), but even with that and my own training I couldn't get a hit on my Instructor. We recently had someone who's done a fair bit of Muai Thai start going to the sessions I go to, and he's pretty damn good. It took me about 30 seconds and I had pretty much sussed his style from watching his movements. That's what my experience in sparring has allowed me to do.

With experience in sparring, your martial psychology can improve because you will know how to react and how to stay calm (amongst other things), and it's possible to learn how to control your opponents movements with enough practice (so I've heard).
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