Author Topic: Help with Lucid Dreaming  (Read 1738 times)

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June 11, 2015, 06:54:28 PM
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JustinReeves

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Hallo, so I'm getting better at recognizing when a dream is actually a dream but I'm still having some issue staying lucid. Like I'll become lucid and aware that it is a dream but a lot of the time it's like I'm slipping away and the dream turns back into a dream I have no control over. Also, I'm having difficulty controlling my dreams. I can become lucid, but when I try to create an object I either stop being lucid or nothing happens. Only in my most recent dream have I accomplished something. I wanted to walk through a wall and I was able to. But when i want to fly it only turns into jumping. Any tips?

June 15, 2015, 06:55:09 PM
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Steve

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Congrats on getting to the first stages of awareness and interaction!

Just keep at it and you will get better with time :) It took me months, if I recall correctly, to finally get to the point of lucid dreaming a whole lot (but then I had to stop because the dreams were too realistic and I started having problems sorting out memories of the dreams from memories of reality >_> )

~Steve
Mastery does not occur when you've performed a feat once or twice. Instead, it comes after years of training, when you realize that you no longer notice when you're performing a feat which used to require so much effort. Even walking takes years of training for a human: why not everything else?

June 15, 2015, 10:24:46 PM
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JustinReeves

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Thanks for your help. Haha yeah even though my lucid dreams aren't that common every now and then I have to stop and think "wait was that a dream?" Lol

June 26, 2015, 02:30:40 AM
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Ekstatikos

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Congratulations! Lucid dreaming is great fun, and I've had some sporadic success with it myself. One of the things I've leant is that having a strategy is important. In the beginning (and I am also a novice at this, but have gotten good advice from various good sources) the most important thing is to 'stabilize' the dream, and your own mental and emotional state. Going lucid in a dream can be very exciting, and this excitement (or fear, or whatever) itself can often knock you out of the dream. So if you don't already, I suggest picking up a daily routine of meditation, to get some control of your thoughts and emotions, which should solve this first issue fairly quickly.

Secondly, you need to stabilize the dream environment, by 'anchoring' yourself into it. The best way to do this is to engage your senses - touch things and really feel them, listen intently, look at things up close in detail. If you can find a mirror in the dream (if you are in a house that is familiar to you for example, or have a sense of where a mirror might be), then looking at yourself in a mirror is also a good way to anchor. Only once you can stabilize yourself and the environment properly does it make sense to move on to object manipulation (just like having consistent dream recall before you move on to attempting to become lucid makes sense, since otherwise you wouldn't remember it even if it worked). Once you then get good at manipulating the dream environment, you can move on to messing with physics, jumping in a superhuman way and so on, and eventually flying. When you have mastered flying, you can start experimenting with some more advanced things, like teleportation, going straight up as far as you can, opening and closing your eyes in the dream, or meditating and doing magic and the likes.

Finally, if you find that you often 'slip back into' the dream after having gone lucid, you need to learn to ignore the dream narrative. Strategy is, again, important here. Things will try to distract you in the dream. A giant flaming fish will pass by and you will want to follow it. Don't. Have a clear plan in mind of what you want to do (stabilize, manipulate objects, physics, whatever the case may be) and stick to it. Rehearse your plan whenever you intend to attempt lucid dreaming, and you should be able to stay focused and not get sucked back into the dream narrative.

Good luck, and happy dreaming!
~ Io Daimon Eriounes Theon ~

"Success is thy proof: argue not; convert not; talk not over much!" ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber AL vel Legis

To Know, To Dare, To Will, To Be Silent, and To Liberate

November 14, 2015, 03:52:46 AM
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Sadrielle

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If you can find a mirror in the dream (if you are in a house that is familiar to you for example, or have a sense of where a mirror might be), then looking at yourself in a mirror is also a good way to anchor.

I give a personal vouch to the strategy technique. The strategy I utilize to ground myself into the dream is going to a place I know well, such as my childhood bedroom and backyard, or my apartment bedroom. I spend time comparing the room's objects and placement of said objects to the real world counterparts, and when I feel adequately present and in control, I set out to do what I intended to do within my lucid dream. Most of the time it's as simple as exploring the dreamscape.

As far as to keep from slipping, make a practice of being fully aware of your surroundings. Use all of your sensory mechanics that you have available. What does the ground beneath your feet feel like? What can you smell? Is it cold? Is it warm? Are there people in the area? If you're in a specific location, what does this location remind you of? Constantly keeping survey of your environment helps you keep from getting lost within it. During the day time, you can utilize focal meditation to help train your brain to better handle staying within the moment during your dream trips.

Also, Ekstatikos... I quoted the above out of sheer amusement. Oddly, I have an absurdly irrational fear of mirrors and reflections within the dream world. The potential of the reflection being something else other than what I expect it to be, or the potential of there being something in the reflection that is live and sentient other than myself is a horror that I've experienced several non-lucid nightmares over. And while the two times I've tried it in a lucid dream have been somewhat anti-climatic, the idea of making it a nightly habit seems like masochism at its finest. :D