Author Topic: needing less sleep, meditation for that?  (Read 4321 times)

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June 03, 2015, 09:29:05 PM
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Tricky

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Forgive me if this is the wrong section. Ive been gone for a long time and im not sure where this would go.

But long story short, i simply dont have time to sleep for 7 hours a night. I have 2 jobs, girlfriend, daughter, need me time, etc..

Is there any specific meditation practices or anything i can practice to need less sleep? Maybe somehow make the little sleep i get more productive?

Thanks :)

June 07, 2015, 06:55:55 PM
Reply #1

kobok

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I almost did not spot this, buried as it is among the other techniques for martially combating sleep.  (I think I'll at least bring it out to the BEA forum.)

One thing that can really help for getting your sleep requirement down is taking some vitamins known for keeping your brain chemistry in good shape.  I recommend trying a combination of D3, B12, Folic Acid, and Panax Ginseng for this.

Then, the next thing which is important is to address the cognitive side of sleep.  To be productive at sleep you need to get your muscles relaxed, your stress level down, and your mind clear so that your dreams can effectively sort out your thoughts.  The muscles can be relaxed by stretching combined with a body-meditation session which focuses on relaxing all of your tensed muscles.  You need to focus on the muscles throughout your body, one section at a time, become aware of their tension, and release it.

To clear the mind and de-stress, enter a deep focused meditative state and then try to identify the major issues that are causing you worry.  Then identify why they cause you worry, such as by exploring the consequences and outcomes you fear, and why those are perceived as significant to you.  Then, replace that worry with a "best known plan", and accept that by selecting a best plan, you have done your best and should release the worry.  If they are complicated, you can write these plans down to help you confidently release it.  But the release of the worry and replacement with a plan is primarily a deep subconscious process.

Then sleep.
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June 07, 2015, 09:48:40 PM
Reply #2

Steve

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Another thing I find helpful is only partially waking up in the morning. Keep much of your body and mind relaxed and in a state of rest while you go about mindless events like showering and eating (give yourself a bit of extra time when you start doing this until you can figure out if it takes extra time to get ready). I don't know what your mornings are like, but this would be more difficult if you have to interact with family and whatnot, and I'd definitely not suggest maintaining that state if you drive.

When you're at work and you get a break, try to get some time away from people and meditate for a few minutes to put yourself back into a state of physical and mental resting, rest for whatever time you can, then take a minute or two to bring yourself out of the restfulness by increasing your breathing and slowly mentally bringing yourself back to awareness. I used to do this when I only got 15 minute breaks; it would take me less than 5 minutes to get into the restful state and less than a couple of minutes to bring me out, so I got around 8 minutes of good rest every few hours, and that helped a lot more than it sounds like it should.

The point you'd be trying to get to is the point right before sleep where you're still barely awake and just aware enough of the environment around you that you'll know when to wake up fully (ie, if your boss walks into the room and starts talking to you before your break is up), and where your brain and body can start the recuperating process. And in case it matters, this should of course only be done in places that you deem as safe, since you're basically dropping your ability to defend yourself in much the same way as when you're asleep.

~Steve
Mastery does not occur when you've performed a feat once or twice. Instead, it comes after years of training, when you realize that you no longer notice when you're performing a feat which used to require so much effort. Even walking takes years of training for a human: why not everything else?

June 10, 2015, 03:07:50 PM
Reply #3

Tricky

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June 15, 2015, 06:52:25 PM
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Steve

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Let us know how each one works out for you, especially whether they are helpful or not :) Feedback is good ^_^

~Steve
Mastery does not occur when you've performed a feat once or twice. Instead, it comes after years of training, when you realize that you no longer notice when you're performing a feat which used to require so much effort. Even walking takes years of training for a human: why not everything else?

July 14, 2015, 01:47:16 AM
Reply #5

TheAghora

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I have a wife, a son, school, a job, I teach martial arts on the side, I meditate daily, and I have hobbies too! So, I have a pretty busy life as it is, I manage about 3 or four hours of sleep a night, some of the time I don't get none. I don't feel tired through out the day though, and here is how I manage it. First, I dislike the idea of sleeping in general. We sleep roughly 1/3 of our life away, and I really dislike thinking about that. So I avoid sleeping as much as possible, though not to the point of making myself sick or a horrible person to be around. I nap almost everyday, though the kind of nap and the length of the nap largely depend upon how much sleep I get later. I usually try to get a 30 or 40 minute nap in through out the day somewhere. Usually about 8 or so hours after I've been awake, around the mid day hat I've been away. I don't ever let it go to an hour, because then I just feel groggy and would rather sleep more. From what I've read, if you sleep for more then an hour your body will release a chemical/hormone that makes you drowsy, or something like that. I also catch smaller naps through out the day.

Day before yesterday I was driving to meet someone for a craigslist deal, getting some free stuff. I hadn't slept in more then 36 hours, and it was getting to a point that I wasn't driving safely. So on the way back I pulled off and took a 15 minute nap. it might not sound like a lot, but it makes a huge difference when you've had no sleep for so long. When I'm riding with friends or something, some of the time I'll take a 5 minute nap here, a 10 minute nap between classes, etc. It all helps to bring more energy back in. Also, I hit the gym for no less then 30 minutes a day, I take the weekends off. I also teach a nightly martial art class, so I hit the gym in the morning and teach at night. Being active helps to raise your base metabolism, and energy levels.  Which is why i like both of them spaced apart, it helps to be my energy high and focused through out the day. Besides that, always having something to do helps to keep me going; focus is important. Meditation helps me to keep a clear and focused mind.

I think it comes down to what some people can handle. I can handle 3 or 4 hours a night, though it depends on you as a person. My little brother (who has been an adult for a while now) needs 10 hours of sleep if he stays up for 24 hours, it takes it out of it really bad. You have to ask yourself; if I get less sleep, is the quality of me worth while? For some people they are like a zombie, and if they would have had 1 or 2 more hours of sleep, the time they have; even though it's less would be much better, and of more use. Anyway, I hope this helps :).

July 24, 2015, 09:14:53 AM
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Li-Ten-Ra

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So sleeping is divided into many smaller stages, which I'm sure you know. The two stages that are most important are the REM cycle, and the pre/post REM cycles. in Pre/post REM, our bodies are repairing and restoring energy reserves, and in REM our mind processes information gathered throughout the day.

So, in order to ensure that you are getting well rested with less sleep, you need to get into those two cycles as quickly as possible. Meditation in and of itself lowers stress levels, and allows the body to repair itself on a much faster level, so practicing simple daily meditation itself should help immensely. However, I know of no meditation that can get you into REM cycles faster. Instead, I might recommend using Binaural Beats or Isochronic Tones, with your focus being on Deep Sleep. Iso-tones is a website that hosts free isochronic tones, including one designed for deep sleep. Youtube also has many free ones, but they are made by individuals with far less experience usually.

You could also take up yoga. Since yoga streches the muscles, detoxifying them and relaxing them, it allows you to get through the pre REM cycles much faster, allowing for faster immersion into REM sleep, and therefore a "better" sleep with less time. Also, I highly recommend a diet low on processed foods, low on unhealthy fats, and avoid heavy protein at least 2 hours before bedtime. Processed foods and unhealthy fats are difficult to digest, and can cause you to remain in Pre REM for much longer than needed. Protein isn't difficult to digest, but it takes time for the body to break down, and the energy from it can make you restless during sleep. Instead, drink one full bottle of water before bed, and take a multi vitamin with it.

July 31, 2015, 03:44:37 PM
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Merlin

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If I drink water before going to bed, I always have to get up in the night to pee.
"Life is not about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself" -George Bernard Shaw

August 01, 2015, 04:11:56 PM
Reply #8

Steve

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Remaining hydrated is good for you. If you maintain a state of restfulness as you move about (take your time), then you should be able to get back to sleep easily without breaking the sleep cycle. It might take some practice, but I find the more tired I am already, the easier it is to remain that way as it's a matter of "not waking up" ie (refrain from becoming alert in the waking state. Allow for minimal brain function to complete the simple task).

~Steve
Mastery does not occur when you've performed a feat once or twice. Instead, it comes after years of training, when you realize that you no longer notice when you're performing a feat which used to require so much effort. Even walking takes years of training for a human: why not everything else?