Author Topic: Panpsychism  (Read 5263 times)

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September 10, 2014, 12:33:08 PM
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ActionOfAll

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What do y'all think about panpsychism? You can read about it here: http://multisenserealism.com/thesis/6-panpsychism/

September 10, 2014, 12:38:28 PM
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Akenu

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Even the first section of the article is not correct...

I would say it's one of those paradigms that was developed after not researching something deeply, making false assumptions and mixing the system from it.

September 11, 2014, 01:35:50 AM
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Ekstatikos

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It's a difficult philosophical question which requires more thought than it has been given in that particular article, and is not as easily dismissed as the above comments attempt to make it out to be.

For good overviews of philosophical subjects, I highly recommend the Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy, which can be found online. Here is a link to their article on panpsychism.
~ Io Daimon Eriounes Theon ~

"Success is thy proof: argue not; convert not; talk not over much!" ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber AL vel Legis

To Know, To Dare, To Will, To Be Silent, and To Liberate

September 11, 2014, 04:58:10 AM
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ActionOfAll

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I am dead exhausted, so I will answer briefly. Brains generate consciousness; however, a single neuron, itself, is not conscious; therefore, if a single neuron is not conscious, how can the matter that comprises that neuron be conscious? The answer is that it cannot. The logic is that brains generate consciousness from different parts of itself; therefore, all of matter is conscious. This is a non-sequitur, so the premise is wrong. The points are also disjointed.

To claim that brains generate consciousness is a pretty bold statement.

EDIT: To add to that, I'd say that it is obvious that there is some sort of strong connection between our brain and our experience, this is scientifically valid. However the capacity for experience itself, regardless of content or intellectual ability etc. is not necessarily caused by the brain; it brings us back to the age-old hard problem of consciousness.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2014, 05:01:28 AM by ActionOfAll »

September 11, 2014, 09:01:16 AM
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ActionOfAll

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Consciousness is a reflexive component of experience; therefore, the brain has the capacity to generate experiences if it generates consciousness, for we can take that for granted. One can empirically observe this in terms of anesthesia. When a person is under, they have no experiences, form no memories, and consciousness is, essentially, disrupted; however, it is possible for people, in these states, to have Out of Body Experiences. What this tells us is that consciousness can be disrupted and lost per inhibiting the parts of the brain responsible for this where there is another entity outside of the brain where it and the consciousness generated from within the brain tend to operate together.. The issue is not whether or not the brain generates consciousness. The issue is whether or not consciousness generated by the brain is all there is. Psi is an empirical case against this.

This was fascinating to read. It put into words and allowed me to process something: Lately I've been thinking about the relationship between the brain and consciousness, particularly from the perspective of drugs being able to manipulate our experiences in such profound ways. Because of this, it is necessary to accept that part of our experience, and indeed the presence of consciousness itself, can be manipulated through the manipulation of brain processes. However, we also see in cases of Psi that the physical universe seems to be causally open as well as consciousness having the ability to switch its focus from the brain to other places as is the case in OBE's. It seems probable, then, that there is a consciousness unique to the brain as well as a consciousness that exists independent of the brain. Do you agree, Rayn? Is there anything you would add to this general explanation or anything you believe is incorrect?


September 12, 2014, 11:45:44 AM
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ActionOfAll

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So can the consciousness generated by the physical brain survive without a connection to the non-physical consciousness? Or is who we are a result of the interaction between the two?

September 17, 2014, 01:14:02 PM
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SpectralPsycho

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I've flirted with the idea of panpsychism in the past, and generally find it quite intellectually attractive.

It's worth pointing out that you can be a panpsychist without discussing consciousness, per se. Panpsychism at its most basic is the idea that mind (not consciousness) is a fundamental character of matter -- that is that all matter has mind. There is a not-so-subtle distinction between mind and consciousness. Computers, for example, have minds, but they are not (yet, and as far as we know) conscious.

I don't find it a particularly bizarre claim that all matter has an element of 'mind-stuff' although personally, I'm inclined to think of information as the base mental building block in the same manner that atoms (or quarks or whatever) are the base building blocks of matter.