Author Topic: Pranayama  (Read 6309 times)

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September 22, 2013, 12:41:25 PM
Reply #15

Koujiryuu

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Hyperventilation occurs when the rate and quantity of alveolar ventilation of carbon dioxide exceeds body's production of carbon dioxide.[1][2]

When alveolar ventilation is excessive, more carbon dioxide will be removed from the blood stream than the body can produce. This causes the concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood stream to fall and produces a state known as hypocapnea (too little carbon dioxide in the blood stream). The body normally attempts to compensate for this metabolically. If excess ventilation cannot be compensated metabolically, it will lead to a rise in blood pH. This rise in blood pH is known as respiratory alkalosis. When hyperventilation leads to respiratory alkalosis, it may cause a number of physical symptoms: dizziness, tingling in the lips, hands or feet, headache, weakness, fainting and seizures. In extreme cases it can cause carpopedal spasms (flapping and contraction of the hands and feet).[3]

Hyperventilation can be voluntary or involuntary. Swimmers sometimes voluntarily hyperventilate in hopes of extending dive time or extending the length of time they can swim underwater without rising to take a breath.[4] Anesthesiologists sometimes recommend that their patients hyperventilate prior to putting them under general anesthesia.[5] Certain kinds of Yoga, for example, Bhastrika yoga also employ voluntary hyperventilation.

Involuntary hyperventilation can occur in response to both physical and emotional stimuli. These include reduced air pressure at high altitudes,[6] raised progesterone levels in pregnancy, head injury, stroke, respiratory disorders such as asthma and pneumonia, cardiovascular problems such as pulmonary embolisms, anemia, adverse reactions to certain drugs, physical or emotional stress, fear, pain, and anxiety. Hyperventilation can also be mechanically produced in people on respirators.[7]

Hyperventilation should not be confused with tachypnea (fast breathing) or hyperpnea (breathing that is faster or deeper than normal). Both these terms neutrally describe the manner of breathing rather than the impact that breathing has on carbon dioxide levels. Exercise, fever, shivering, and other disorders can cause the body to produce more carbon dioxide than normal. The body attempts to correct for this by breathing more rapidly and deeply. This corrective behavior does not lead to excess ventilation. Rather it brings the body into balance by compensating for excess CO2 production. Thus hyperpnea in this context is not hyperventilation.

In fact, if the excess CO2 production cannot be completely cast off via hyperpnea, then a person will in fact be hypoventilating even though they are breathing faster or more deeply than normal. For example, in certain respiratory disorders, the transfer of carbon dioxide from the blood to the alveoli may be blocked. No matter how deep or fast the person tries to breathe, they cannot expel enough carbon dioxide.


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In normal breathing, both the depth and frequency of breaths are varied by the neural (or nervous) system, primarily in order to maintain normal amounts of carbon dioxide but also to supply appropriate levels of oxygen to the body's tissues. This is mainly achieved by measuring the carbon dioxide content of the blood; normally, a high carbon dioxide concentration signals a low oxygen concentration, as we breathe in oxygen and breathe out carbon dioxide at the same time, and the body's cells use oxygen to burn fuel molecules, making carbon dioxide as a by-product. Normal minute ventilation is generally 58 liters of air per minute at rest for a 70 kg man.

If carbon dioxide levels are high, the body assumes that oxygen levels are low, and accordingly, the brain's blood vessels dilate to assure sufficient blood flow and supply of oxygen. Conversely, low carbon dioxide levels cause the brain's blood vessels to constrict, resulting in reduced blood flow to the brain and lightheadedness. The gases in the alveoli of the lungs are nearly in equilibrium with the gases in the blood. Normally, less than 10% of the gas in the alveoli is replaced with each breath taken. Deeper or quicker breaths as in hyperventilation exchange more of the alveolar gas with ambient air and have the net effect of expelling more carbon dioxide from the body, since the carbon dioxide concentration in normal air is very low.The resulting low concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood is known as hypocapnia. Since carbon dioxide is carried as bicarbonate in the blood, the loss of carbon dioxide will drive bicarbonate to combine with hydrogen ions (protons) to form more carbon dioxide. The loss of hydrogen ions results in the blood becoming alkaline, i.e. the blood pH value rises. This is known as a respiratory alkalosis.

This alkalization of the blood causes vessels to constrict (vasoconstriction). The high pH value resulting from hyperventilation also reduces the level of available calcium (hypocalcemia), which affects the nerves and muscles, causing constriction of blood vessels and tingling. This occurs because alkalization of the plasma proteins (mainly albumin) increases their calcium binding affinity, thereby reducing free ionized calcium levels in the blood. Therefore, low levels of carbon dioxide can cause tetany by altering the albumin binding of calcium such that the ionised (physiologically influencing) fraction of calcium is reduced.

From Wikipedia, bolded for emphasis, these are the scientific facts

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You can do whatever you want to do but I don't have to agree with the validity of the practice, and I will stick to my opinion that these practices are dangerous and unhealthy. This isn't coming from any kind of background other than a medical Scientific one. I'm not going to touch the argument about hallucinations, voodoo, spirits and so on because they can't be proven one way or another, so I will continue to believe what I do.

I hope this works out well for the original poster, I sincerely do Feint, and from the sounds of it it is. It is just not for everyone, and potentially dangerous, so I'm obliged to give a warning to anyone else reading who is considering these methods. It has nothing to do with a Chinese paradigm (keep in mind I do Yoga too and I've written about it extensively here). It has everything to do with the medical dangers of these practices, and the fact that they restrict oxygen flow to the brain.

Regards.
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September 22, 2013, 05:28:06 PM
Reply #16

Feint

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I know my limits which is why I only do three rounds of 25, 30, and 35 breaths per round. I also don't go straight into the next round, I take some deep breaths to get me relaxed. I could see if you think I may be doing it carelessly. But I am not. I also do it for free diving despite only being able to hold my breath for only a minute 45. When I do the breath holding, sometimes I can't take it and breathe out in the middle of the round. I've never been near fainting ever when practicing. I also did my research before, but I trust Swami Rama and his technique. He gives warnings within the book too. Thanks for the notice and I do know you do yoga too.

September 22, 2013, 07:38:30 PM
Reply #17

Koujiryuu

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From a general standpoint, I don't think these practices are essential or necessary for development. Basic meditation with deep belly breathing is more than sufficient for most people to make progress. I think that if you are under the tutilege of a Guru in an Ashram and you trust the Guru, and he instructs you to do these methods, that they can be safe and acceptable. I think that you personally already possess understanding and the capacity to do them, and that is why you can do them safely from a book. I personally believe that 95% of people out there, especially people reading this forum, could be potentially harmed by the methods, and that's why I advise against them.

It's quite similar to Daoist sexual practices. These are something I would never practice myself unless I received proper instruction from a master, and they aren't necessary anyway for progression. Certain breathing methods are the same, and can potentially mess you up more than they benefit you.

I hope they work out for you. Don't do too much too soon, and if you notice any negative side effects, I would advise you to stop practicing them or find an instructor who can teach them to you safely and guide your practice.

Namaste.
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September 24, 2013, 12:39:00 AM
Reply #18

Akenu

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Sigh.... Holding your breath is bad, level of oxygen in blood is sinking, you will have a shallow breathing, your voice will be dry, blah, blah, blah.
You know, people, you might finally at least read the criticism of the studies you are referencing here (without the actual reference, talking about either doctors or scientists, what a dogma...).
Yes, holding your breath can be very dangerous, if you suffer from apnea. And btw, this study you all reference so much was made based on another study, which talks about holding your breath for a longer period than 3 minutes.

Now, to get to the topic, you, Koujiryuu, should know older Qi Gong practice where it was advised to hold your breath for 7 heartbeats (just saying). And holding your breath for a reasonable amount of time (speaking about seconds, not minutes), is actually good for your lungs and your blood circulation system, holding your breath after exhale also helps your lungs to recover and in return push more oxygen to your blood during inhale.

Of course you can prove me wrong, just reference a correct study in serious scientific magazine that says that holding your breath for seconds can cause you ill even without apnea, or smite me to prove you have no such study to back your claims up :D.

September 24, 2013, 01:26:59 PM
Reply #19

Feint

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True. He did find it in a wikipedia article.

September 26, 2013, 03:17:57 PM
Reply #20

mystic

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Dispelling some of the comments here by posing this question

Would you put a 5 year old in Calculus?

It's a serious question. In fact, my first Calculus teacher would bring his niece to class every class as a point of motivation. And to us, it seemed as if she understood Calculus at a very young age. The problem is, she didn't understand Calculus fully and the reason why is because she didn't know arithmetic.I remember talking to my teacher about my observation and he chuckled as he said you got it!

But then he said something else to me.

Everything in this world is built on a foundation. If a person tries to make a skyscraper with a faulty foundation, you better believe this skyscraper is going to fall. And fast too!

The axiom isn't one that isn't of light or to bring humor. THINK ABOUT IT.

The central point of this discussion (at least given from Feint's pov) is pranyama. Which is fine. It is a good thing to discuss. And depending on the person, they can practice pranyama without initiating too much of a foundation primarily because it is breathing. But as subtle as breath is, at higher levels it is a dangerous focal point because the higher the level, there is no breath. You do not breathe. You lose the medullary centers to even initiate breath to begin with (let alone lose sense of reality).

It's a warning. Pure and simple. A very big warning.

Feint, what you don't understand (or assume to) is my lineage. My tradition uses dan tian (lower dan tian) as a means of initiating stillness, but that's not all we do. We use the dan tian because it is also the easiest way to initiate stillness and promote the same results other traditions initiate at different focal points (e.g. middle of the head, koan, or the heart). In this, we have to learn both Chinese and Indian philosophies because the two are similar in the goal. To merge prana / apana (yin / yang whatever) and bring it out and ultimately escape the cycle of karma.

To assume I don't know anything about Indian cultural practices is a horrible assumption. While I haven't been to India in a year, I did see and learn from some amazing master's in India. True stream enterers in a place some of my Chinese teachers swore there is no progress.

This isn't about tooting my own horn about my experiences (we'd be here all day and night actually).

The point is whether performing pranyama is a good idea.

I still stand by my statement that pranyama (and several other interconnected practices) are apart of a larger canon that ultimately is supposed to make the person escape the cycle of birth and death. And unfortunately your book doesn't do that. At all. And therein lies the issue.

Amongst others...

Quote
Retaining the breath is just another way to 1) center the breath in a psychic center for cultivation, 2) help the energy move to where it needs to go without force or intention and, 3) develop a healthier and fuller aura. For martial arts it helps develop martial power and pack chi into the body.

I've seen a lot of things in my time, but I've never seen any of that happen.

Posing a question here for point 1 & 2

What is to say that you need to hold breath to focus on a psychic center? Who dictates that? Mind. You do not need to hold your breath.

In terms of point 3, I cannot say, I have never seen an aura before. I've again seen a lot of things, but never saw that.

In terms of condensation of chi and development of jing, this is not something that really should happen. It is apart of the bone marrow classics, but it isn't necessary to cultivate chi in such a inane and (frankly) retarded way. Meditation actually develops jing far more effectively.

Quote
Advanced Buddhist breathing contains elements of hyperventilation or what looks like it as well. They are advanced but with proper concentration and practice they energize and empower, but can also get you dizzy and nauseated and not all pranayama is about hyperventilation and is even warned against severly for the uninatiated and beginner.

The tradition you are referring to is not relative to breath and it is good that you mention 'what looks like it as well'. It is an outgrowth of the flow of chi and development of their practices that yields that. Taking an observation yields that...it doesn't really explain the true story of what is going on, or the level of training and expertise it took to reach that point.

For jest, one of my teachers doesn't have to draw breath for about an hour or two. It isn't because he is holding his breath though...It's because the dan is doing his breathing.

John Chang doesn't have to breathe for three days. Again it isn't because he is holding his breath, it is because the dan tian is doing his breathing for him. Because he has cultivated stillness to the point that drawing breath decreases almost to the point of cessation.

Feint don't be fooled by a book...

September 26, 2013, 04:40:33 PM
Reply #21

Feint

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Clearly I need to explain further. I am just heading into a direction where I want to cleanse the nadis within my body. Within the book says that Pranayama is what is used to cleanse the nadis. Again just because I have a bias because the book was written by Swami Rama (who was actually tested in a lab for his abilities) doesn't mean my goal is within reach just yet. I am still on the stepping stone. My goal is raja yoga. Samadhi. I still have yet to master pratyahara, dharana, dhyana and finally samadhi. This is only the fourth step. I just stand to be adept within the skill then move on. I said it was a long term (lifetime) goal to reach the greater part of pranayama like kevali.

September 26, 2013, 06:14:16 PM
Reply #22

mystic

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Feint, I'm not going to try to tell you how to practice. But I am going to point out somethings that are detrimental to your practice.

I'm quoting myself in the What is Jing thread

Quote
But something that I've noticed throughout the time I have been posting again is a constant reference to the concepts.

The concepts are important, if not for a mere discussion at a cocktail party or in a scholastic light. But we aren't necessarily here to discuss things scholastically. We are here to learn, and ultimately here to practice.

Knowledge of Jing only helps when describing phenomenon. But it also helps create another mental block. To say this logical phrase of if this, then that.

Don't fall for such a mental trapping!

Just be and just practice.

If you eliminate the mental obstructions (e.g. I want to open my third eye, feel my jing, project jing, allow shen to travel) and actually practice, no matter what noble path you undertake, you see progress

That's the most important part of this. Practice.

So get out and stand in zz. Or if you want, go to the gym. Go out and perform szg (if you will), or live. You will find that the ingredients collect and form the dan tian. But you still have to practice to actually enter the dan tian.

In that regard, who cares about jing?

You can substitute jing for nadis, samadhi, jnanas, etc etc etc.

The bottom line is this. The methods you're performing have a specific goal and even if swami rama copied and pasted from noble traditions and saw a little progress, it doesn't mean that you may see progress.

You want to cleanse your nadis. Why? To reach Samadhi, that's what you said. Why reach samadhi?

I've reached samadhi and frankly I'll tell you this. You won't reach anywhere focusing on the siddhis. You won't reach anything without meditation. And you won't reach Samadhi without letting go and gaining a proper foundation.

Right frame, right thought, right mind, right practice. These are important elements that lead to progress.

I'll tell you something. I'm not supposed to eat carbs (grains really) or have sex. I did.

I reached Samadhi.

Don't get caught by mental trappings of if I do this, then I'll reach this goal with this siddhi and then so on and so on and so on.

It doesn't work that way.

Right frame, right thought, right mind, right practice.

Those four pillars will help you gain foundation in whatever path you undertake. But ultimately you have to be ready to realize you don't have the proper foundation. And I'm not saying this to say a school or method is superior. I'm saying it because of the progress you've had (or lack thereof).

Instead of focusing on the Siddhis in hope you gain the right jnanas, why don't you live? Let go of this. Live life burn your external karma and build a high ethic.

That will lead to far more results than what you're practicing.

September 26, 2013, 08:02:55 PM
Reply #23

Mind_Bender

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Sure, you don't need to hold your breath to feel or fill a psychic center but it can help and you don't need to use breath to move energy but it helps. By aura is meant the subtle perceptions of your outer energetic field, which is not exactly visible anyway.

When it comes to condensing qi into your area that is being struck is foundational for hardstyle training of which I grew up in, and frankly, you are the third qigong practitioner I have talked to that is condenscending- calling a practice you may not agree with 'retarded' is 1) immature 2) rude and 3) an opinion even if your Sifu taught you that way, because it is their opinion from personal experience and mastery where a Shaolin or Okinawan practitioner will have a different opinion from their experience.

From a magical standpoint, focusing on the Siddhis as a way towards self-perfection is just as noble as focusing on union with the divine. The same principles apply for developing magical ability, divine union and enlightenment and the idea that Siddhis are bad are from one set of gurus where others will not agree. The schism between Siddhis and Enlightenment is just a hocus pocus argument that has been going on since the invention of religion, and probably before.
"Spirit is in a state of grace forever.
Your reality is only spirit.
Therefore you are in a state of grace forever."

"As relfections of the Source, we are little gods."

"...part of me doesn't want to believe that auto-eroticism while crushing on a doodle (sigil) could manifest a check in the mail box, but hey, it did."

"Everybody laughs the same language."

September 26, 2013, 09:05:41 PM
Reply #24

Feint

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Again mystic. Did I say anything about siddhis besides levitation? I said my goal is raja yoga! You keep saying something else. Only samadhi is what you read up to and you had not read further. I am trying to reach the states they have said and explained within the book. The whole part is for me to have a very tranquil mind. Also I don't want to reach samadhi only once as you are explaining, I want to make it normal. The kumbhaka helps to reach the perfect state of pratyahara whereas I withdraw all my senses. You are more of a nuisance telling me the latter. If you find yourself offended by the post, I could tell you are biased by what your masters tell you. I agree with Mind Bender. Despite siddhis being called evil, it is in the way you use it that makes it evil. How am I going to kill someone by levitating? Seriously. I can only imagine that levitation will benefit my own enlightenment within its own time. If you really reached samadhi, would you really be biased to tell me this information from what I have read is wrong? That the person I am reading about is wrong? That he is not a true Swami? He was recorded within a book called beyond biofeedback. He showed them his control of the body. I know my practices are true and there is nothing you are going to say to me that will tell me it is wrong.

September 27, 2013, 05:06:59 AM
Reply #25

mystic

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Mindbender and Feint

It's actually quite sad that the only thing you can really do is pick one element of the post instead of looking at the post for what it is. An experience from someone that's done the incorrect practices with and without a master.

Mindbender - specifically I practiced several shaolin southern style and hung gar (lots of emphasis on strength) but more practice is emphasized on building strength in legs and opening channels in legs through zhan zhuang and less of any bone marrow practices.

BTW one of my very first teachers was okinawan (a very old lady I called elfie who has passed. but was she so strong she was still punching bricks in old age! what a mouth she had!)

Again right mind, right frame, right practice, right thought.

That leads to the result. But in also doing so is realizing the result is not the reason to practice in and of itself.

Why do you feel I'm condescending when giving my experience and my conclusion? Does it hurt your ego? Why? What is your ego and who are you in regards to your ego? I'm not asking this question for you (mindbender or whoever you are in real life outside of the internet) to answer. But to spurn a thought of where things derive. That drives insight and further analysis of things.

Feint congratulations.

I hope you realize siddhi has several different connotations here. It isn't just the supernatural ability, but it is also the knowledge gained. But you can also say jnana in this case. Some gurus will use the terms uniquely and interchangeably but that's another story for another day. I also never said siddhis were evil either. I did say focusing on them (both in the sense of the ability gained by the experience and knowledge itself) will not lead to the samadhi state (samadhi == stillness)

Again instead of looking at the single tree in the forest, look at the entire forest.

I am not offended by your posts. But the posts...are...not even unnerving. You're just not ready for anything. Which is a shame you read something you see a lot of things that can enrich your life. It's how we all started.

There's a season for these things and nothing will grow when it isn't the right season.

This isn't the right season for you and what I am saying. And that's perfectly fine. Be well in your practices but chances are you won't reach the state you desire. No one really does with that frame of thought.

I've already explained the how to reach that state (if you didn't see it that's fine too, you won't see it).

Be well Feint, truly. I honestly pray you get a competent teacher to guide you into these practices because they are truly amazing practices to undertake when done in the right way. They do transform your life and make you become ultimately a better person. But of course that depends on your teacher (if he or she comes).

Good luck to you  :)

September 27, 2013, 05:26:08 AM
Reply #26

Akenu

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So, what do we have here?

Mindbender and Feint

It's actually quite sad that the only thing you can really do is pick one element of the post instead of looking at the post for what it is.

As you have never done that before, mystic.

Quote
An experience from someone that's done the incorrect practices with and without a master.

Mindbender - specifically I practiced several shaolin southern style and hung gar (lots of emphasis on strength) but more practice is emphasized on building strength in legs and opening channels in legs through zhan zhuang and less of any bone marrow practices.

BTW one of my very first teachers was okinawan (a very old lady I called elfie who has passed. but was she so strong she was still punching bricks in old age! what a mouth she had!)

So, some list of past experiences + some astounding story about your teacher(s), last time it was the not-breathing guy and now the old brick breaker, ok.

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Again right mind, right frame, right practice, right thought.

Here you start your very first suggestion, you had quite some preparation for that. Here you suggest that you know what is the right frame and the right practice.

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That leads to the result. But in also doing so is realizing the result is not the reason to practice in and of itself.
And here is another suggestion, being in the first sentence, the second one is merely a distraction. That leads to the result, there is no other way (Listen me, mortals!!!!).

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Why do you feel I'm condescending when giving my experience and my conclusion? Does it hurt your ego? Why? What is your ego and who are you in regards to your ego? I'm not asking this question for you (mindbender or whoever you are in real life outside of the internet) to answer. But to spurn a thought of where things derive. That drives insight and further analysis of things.

Nice ending, unfortunately, the conclusion was wrong, it was actually your ego that was hurt. That's why you made this psychic attack, assuming a role of the all-knowing father that wants only the best for his children.

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Feint congratulations.

This starts with downsizing person's self-esteem, making him looking like an idiot, a really clever move because now the "explaining" (understand: trying to cover one's mistake) will be much easier.

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I hope you realize siddhi has several different connotations here. It isn't just the supernatural ability, but it is also the knowledge gained.

And..... there it goes :D.

I won't do the rest of analysis, because I believe that Mind Bender pretty much knows what this is about. And Feint, keep this in mind: Don't let anyone to dictate over your life, to tell you what is correct and incorrect, what is right and wrong, follow your heart and your practices, you look pretty solid outside, but I know you have a doubtful heart, that's a good thing, it helps you to listen to people and to learn new things, it also helps you to admit you were wrong, which is a very noble characteristics. Mystic doesn't have these characteristics, be careful and don't listen to his words, their only purpose is to make it look he is right because else his esteem suffers.

September 27, 2013, 05:29:07 AM
Reply #27

Akenu

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@Feint: Sorry, I nearly forgot, you wanted something for clearing nadis, right?
http://akenu.blogspot.com/2012/10/nine-breaths.html

September 27, 2013, 11:08:23 AM
Reply #28

Feint

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Well, I am GMAN12 and crust800 on other forums, so I could say I read your blog all the time :)

September 27, 2013, 01:49:11 PM
Reply #29

Mind_Bender

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It's actually quite sad that the only thing you can really do is pick one element of the post instead of looking at the post for what it is. An experience from someone that's done the incorrect practices with and without a master. [...] Mindbender - specifically I practiced several shaolin southern style and hung gar (lots of emphasis on strength) but more practice is emphasized on building strength in legs and opening channels in legs through zhan zhuang and less of any bone marrow practices. [...] BTW one of my very first teachers was okinawan (a very old lady I called elfie who has passed. but was she so strong she was still punching bricks in old age! what a mouth she had!)

I come from a fighting back round. We didn't do zhang zuang nor do anything with qi in the beginning. We breathed deep, concentrated on our technique and fought our hearts out. I'm a 'jing' fighter and all the fighting naturally builds an Iron Body, meaning, your qi is condensing into your body and bones only you are not doing it through formal qigong methods. Different ways to do the same thing. And your elder Okinawan friend/mentor most likely went through all of the hard training the Okinawans do and stopped for whatever reason, and if she didn't, she is the exception not the rule. Just so you know, my martial and energetic training is not from books alone, I grew up with a father deeply ingrained in the local martial arts community (as a Sensei) with a solid back round in Pranic Healing (taught by a Master of Chinese Medicine) and Western massage. I'm no kid that reads a book and articles from Veritas and argues because I want to be right, I've 'been around the block' and because of my upbringing I have always kept an open mind (especially in my older years) and you seem to just want to be right or are just so blinded by your own doctrine you can't see the essence of the Dao- it cannot be explained in words, so why are you telling us we are wrong on our personal path to Dao? (If you haven't realized this by now, ALL things are under the Dao, so it is a relevant question that I hope you answer).

When it comes to how bad condensing qi is for whatever reason, my father trained with an Uechi Ryu Sandan who trained under Shihan Alan Dollar who was a direct student of Kanei Uechi the son of the founder of Uechi Ryu, one of the most respected Iron Body styles in the world, not to mention my fathers latest Sensei was at least a 9 Crowned World Champion in open tournament Karate sparring and kata. I started as a fighter and developed as a fighter. I'm a hard style practitioner with soft elements added in (under the direct and private tutelage of a Baguazhang SIfu and Master of Traditional Chinese medicine for over a year. Although I disagree with his current qigong method, his kung fu is great) to strengthen my focus, body and energy, and you seem to have taken the softer path altogether, good for you, but our training methods are different and neither of us are right but on different paths. Simple.

Again right mind, right frame, right practice, right thought.

I do this and Feint seems to as well, just not according to your gospel.

Why do you feel I'm condescending when giving my experience and my conclusion? Does it hurt your ego? Why? What is your ego and who are you in regards to your ego? I'm not asking this question for you (mindbender or whoever you are in real life outside of the internet) to answer. But to spurn a thought of where things derive. That drives insight and further analysis of things.

Let me quote myself here as you clearly are too muddled in your own self-righteousness to understand how calling something retarded is not the voice of a mature practitioner of any style or path;

...calling a practice you may not agree with 'retarded' is 1) immature 2) rude and 3) an opinion even if your Sifu taught you that way, because it is their opinion from personal experience...

I would quote and argue the rest, but I'll leave that to Feint if it is so important to remark on your ego-maniacal Sifu-syndrome.
"Spirit is in a state of grace forever.
Your reality is only spirit.
Therefore you are in a state of grace forever."

"As relfections of the Source, we are little gods."

"...part of me doesn't want to believe that auto-eroticism while crushing on a doodle (sigil) could manifest a check in the mail box, but hey, it did."

"Everybody laughs the same language."