Author Topic: Qigong Study Group: Week 1  (Read 11997 times)

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May 31, 2013, 07:11:01 PM
Reply #15

Shadow_Dragon

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One last question: Doing the forms for 10 minutes would result in more than 27 repetitions. Should one not exceed 27 repetitions?
Be extremely subtle, even to the point of formlessness. Be extremely mysterious, even to the point of soundlessness. Thereby you can be the director of the opponent's fate. -Sun Tzu

When the Mind is clear and still, all things under Heaven fall into place. -Lao Tzu

Drink your cup alone, though it taste of blood and tears, and praise God for the gift of taste. -Almustafa

May 31, 2013, 08:05:21 PM
Reply #16

Koujiryuu

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Stick with 27 repetitions for now.

After the group concludes, when you're more used to doing Qigong, you can move up to more. (108 is a good number.)
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May 31, 2013, 10:24:09 PM
Reply #17

malignant rice

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Is there a way to tell whether or not we could handle more repititions without risking the negative effects?

May 31, 2013, 11:30:45 PM
Reply #18

Koujiryuu

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Is there a way to tell whether or not we could handle more repititions without risking the negative effects?

Honestly, this is hard to say.

You don't want to do too much too fast.

Just stick with the recommendation for now.
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June 02, 2013, 10:33:50 AM
Reply #19

jwax33

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Do you know of a good book or reference that has diagrams of the forms that I can refer to to make sure I'm doing things right?  Something I can copy or print to take outside when I'm practicing these would be great.

June 02, 2013, 12:12:36 PM
Reply #20

random_noob

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Instead of keeping a sort of experience journal like many of the others in this study group do, I will post my experience with a task whenever we get a new one. Please don't interpret this inactivity as lack of interest.

Apart from that, I feel like after those few days of Qigong, my void meditation has already gotten noticeably deeper, so I thank you for sharing your knowledge with us.

June 02, 2013, 01:10:54 PM
Reply #21

Koujiryuu

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Do you know of a good book or reference that has diagrams of the forms that I can refer to to make sure I'm doing things right?  Something I can copy or print to take outside when I'm practicing these would be great.

No, this is why I made videos. I'll look at some of my Qigong books and see if I can find them in them though.

Instead of keeping a sort of experience journal like many of the others in this study group do, I will post my experience with a task whenever we get a new one. Please don't interpret this inactivity as lack of interest.

Apart from that, I feel like after those few days of Qigong, my void meditation has already gotten noticeably deeper, so I thank you for sharing your knowledge with us.

Post your experience in the numbered exercise threads once. This is all that is required of you each week. However, it would be good to read and memorize the terminology and concepts too, so you have some idea of the basis behind Qigong.
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June 03, 2013, 07:57:52 AM
Reply #22

icefire

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The heat I get is sometimes pretty intense. I've split into doing these excercises at separate times, is that a good or a bad idea?

June 03, 2013, 02:15:26 PM
Reply #23

Koujiryuu

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The heat I get is sometimes pretty intense. I've split into doing these excercises at separate times, is that a good or a bad idea?

You should probably do them all at the same time. If you must, split it up like this:

Lifting the Sky
10 minutes Zen meditation
Pushing Water
10 minutes Zen meditation
Shaolin Archer
Finish with Zen meditation for as long as you want to.

This way, your session isn't hours apart, and you're giving yourself a cooldown period of meditation in between forms.
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June 04, 2013, 04:13:12 PM
Reply #24

Koujiryuu

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Do you know of a good book or reference that has diagrams of the forms that I can refer to to make sure I'm doing things right?  Something I can copy or print to take outside when I'm practicing these would be great.

Update: I have looked through "The Root of Chinese Qigong" by Dr Yang Jwing-Ming and while the book is excellent for Qigong theory, it doesn't really show these exercises or have many practical exercises.

However, "Lifting the Sky" is also called "Gathering Clouds". I had a nice website with pictures of this exercise but I couldn't find it.

Can't find much on Pushing Water either, though Shaolin Archer is common and accurate.

The videos are correct in the execution of the forms. Please practice them as presented.

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June 04, 2013, 08:08:01 PM
Reply #25

jwax33

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Thanks for looking.  I think the repetition is finally burning it into my brain, but I have a very crappy memory these days.  :D  Hope to move it outside fully soon.

June 04, 2013, 09:00:06 PM
Reply #26

malignant rice

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Koujiryuu, could you give a rundown as to what is happening inside of our bodies during each exercise? I'm curious as to how the forms affect our energy.

June 04, 2013, 09:17:17 PM
Reply #27

Koujiryuu

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Koujiryuu, could you give a rundown as to what is happening inside of our bodies during each exercise? I'm curious as to how the forms affect our energy.


Qi is led around the body during each form. The process of doing this removes blockages and obstructions.

I can't say specifically where or how the Qi is moving, because it's different for each person. However, if you look in the "experience" thread for the 3 Qigong Forms, you will definitely notice a trend. This would be that in doing the exercise with arm movements leading up, energy flows out to the arms and hands, and when doing the exercise with arm movements pushing down, energy moves back down into the Dantian or even the ground. Thus, a lot of common experiences people have reported with, say, Lifting the Sky, have been that when you bring the arms up Qi moves out to the hands and when you lower them down again Qi moves into the ground through the legs (or goes to the Dantian).

Later, we will learn more about the 8 Extraneous Meridians system, and learn another Qigong set called Baduanjin (8 Pieces of Silk). In practicing that, you are encouraged to try and become sensitive to the movements of Qi through the meridians and report your experiences. Over time, when you build up sensitivity to Qi, it is easy to feel and know how the movements affect your Qi. Eventually, you may even get to a point where just watching a video of someone doing Qigong, you are able to figure out the breath patterns and energy movements just by watching.
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June 06, 2013, 01:32:50 PM
Reply #28

SMFforumID

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I've been working on the exercises this past week, but mostly I've been focusing on trying to remember the forms accurately and remembering what I'm feeling. I'll post my experiences there, but I have a few questions. Sorry if they are too detailed.

Exercise 1


for Form 1:

   1) Do the hands need to touch each other when bringing the arms down?

   2) I am having a problem with syncing my breathing with the movement. At what specific point during the movement should the
 
inhale begin and what point should it end? Should the exhale begin the instant the hands start to be brought down and the inhale

the instant the hands begin to be brought up? If the movement is done slower or faster will the corresponding breath also be slower

or faster? Is there a one-to-one relationship between the breath and movement (1 complete movement for 1 complete breath)?

   3) I am having a problem with the syncing of lowering and raising the body in conjunction with using the knees. Should the

lowering of the body while bending the knees begin the instant the hands begin to be raised and end the instant the hands reach

their highest point? Should the raising of the body while un-bending the knees begin the instant the hands reach their highest point

and end when the hands reach their lowest point (at the side) or the lowest "crossed point" before they are released?

   4) How far down should one go using the knees and how far back should the back go when the arms are going up?

   

for Form 2:

   1) How far down should one go using the knees?

   2) Are the arms to be locked at all when coming up or when there at the up position?

   3) Is the breath to be held at all when the arms reach their horizontal position or is the inhale still continuing a bit while the

arms are held outstretched for a bit? (My body seems to want to do this naturally)? or do the arms continue to be lifted (very slowly)

while also very slowly inhaling when the arms near their horizontal position?when their horizontal position is neared?



for Form 3:

   1) Is the weight to be distributed evenly over both legs throughout the entire exercise or is the weight to be shifted to the leg

on the side that is "pulling back the bow" when "pulling back the bow" or only slightly shifted to that leg?

   2) Should the arms be "feeling as if they are tensing" as if one is actually pulling back a bow or should they be completely

relaxed?

   3) For the the hand shaped like an L, a variant that I have seen is instead of the L being up it is foreward. Is there any

particular reason why up and not foreward? Are there any other variants that you are aware of?

   4) Is the breath to be held at all when the arms reach their extended stretched out bow positions or is the inhale still

continuing a bit while the arms are held in the extended stretched out bow position for a bit?  Or do the arms continue to "pull the

bow" (very slowly) while also very slowly inhaling when the arms near their extended stretched out bow position? (My body seems

to want to do this naturally)?


Exercise 2:

   1) Can the eyes blink or do you have to stare and not blink?

   2) Someone once told be that if I do any sitting meditation that I should sit on a pillow so that my coccyx is raised slightly. I

don't remember why that was said but what effects would this have?

June 06, 2013, 03:14:26 PM
Reply #29

Koujiryuu

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I am not going to answer all of this because a lot of it is explained by just watching the videos.

If you watch the videos and mimic what I'm doing, and follow the inhale/exhale instructions, you should be fine. A lot of these questions are redundant. You are overcomplicating the exercises greatly.

Form 1, the hands can touch on the way down or not. It really doesn't matter. You inhale as you begin to raise the arms up, and exhale as you bring them down. You do not bend the knees at all in coordination with hand movements. Keep the knees slightly bent and stick your hips out to straighten the small of your back. This is basically the Wu Qi (Wu Chi) stance. Keep your legs locked in this position and stable the whole time.

Form 2, you go as low down on the balls of the feet and bend the knees as much as you can comfortably. Yes, you hold the breath for about a second upon bringing the arms up, parallel to the ground. No, you don't lock your elbows or arms at all, you want to do it totally relaxed.

Form 3, horse stance is a double weighted stance. The weight is distributed evenly on both feet. This does not change with the arm movements. I don't know what you mean by variants. Just do the exercise as instructed.

Zen meditation, you can blink.

It would have been great if you asked these questions at the BEGINNING of the week and a half when I posted them instead of one day before the next lesson is going to be posted.

Again, watch the videos and stop overcomplicating things so much. Everyone else was able to practice the exercises, confident they were doing them correctly, based on my videos.
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