Author Topic: What's the best time to record dreams?  (Read 2132 times)

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November 04, 2012, 07:41:11 AM
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JahMonk

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Hi everyone,

last 3 nights i tried to record some of my dreams. but i only had some results on the first day.
sometimes it was hard to get up and write down what you've dreamed and than back to sleep.
but what i wanna know is, someone gave me times to wake up and write everything down i dreamed and these times are: 10pm-12am // 12am-2am // 2am - 2:45am// 2:45-3:30am // 3:30am - 4:15am // 4:15am - 5am.

i had the idea that after 2am the record time was too short or something.
so i hope someone can give me some tips or advice.
are these times correct or what i have to change/apply?

Thanks&Greetings JahMonk
Babylon Keep Spreading Lies, No Matter If Someone Dies.
Keep open up your eyes, Humanity have to Rise.

November 06, 2012, 08:23:29 PM
Reply #1

Iatros

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You don't need to follow complex time schedules in order to record dreams, and in all honesty I doubt that following such schedules will help very much. It is likely that the times you were given were intended to have you wake up during the R.E.M. stage of sleep. Awakening during REM sleep makes it more likely that dreams will be remembered upon waking, but it by no means necessary for remembering dreams. Do not succumb to the misconception that dreams only occur during REM; the existence of wake-induced lucid dreams (WILDs) should be proof enough that dreams can occur at any time during sleep.

And so, the best time to record dreams is simply as soon as you remember them. There's not really a way to get around having to wake up and write them down, so you may as well just sleep through the night, wake up when you normally would have to and write down anything you remember then. For what it's worth, REM periods last longer closer to morning, so if you want to do anything at all differently, just wake up a little earlier than normal on occasion.

As an additional practice, you may find it helpful to re-read your recent dreams occasionally during the day, and eventually to practice remembering your dreams without re-reading them (although you should still write them down) in order to practice with your new form of memory.
"And in this lies my honour and my reward, - / That whenever I come to the fountain to drink I find the living water itself thirsty; / And it drinks me while I drink it." - Almustafa

November 06, 2012, 08:28:37 PM
Reply #2

XxxX_Edyn_XxxX

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Ive never heard that there is a certain time you should write your dreams down, i just thought as soon as you wake up you write it down. If you want a better dream recall than you need more sleep. the more sleep you get the more sleep cycles you go through, which means you will have more dreams.

November 07, 2012, 10:44:20 AM
Reply #3

JahMonk

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Ive never heard that there is a certain time you should write your dreams down, i just thought as soon as you wake up you write it down. If you want a better dream recall than you need more sleep. the more sleep you get the more sleep cycles you go through, which means you will have more dreams.

Thanks i see the method is a harder way or something while it's actually easier

You don't need to follow complex time schedules in order to record dreams, and in all honesty I doubt that following such schedules will help very much. It is likely that the times you were given were intended to have you wake up during the R.E.M. stage of sleep. Awakening during REM sleep makes it more likely that dreams will be remembered upon waking, but it by no means necessary for remembering dreams. Do not succumb to the misconception that dreams only occur during REM; the existence of wake-induced lucid dreams (WILDs) should be proof enough that dreams can occur at any time during sleep.

And so, the best time to record dreams is simply as soon as you remember them. There's not really a way to get around having to wake up and write them down, so you may as well just sleep through the night, wake up when you normally would have to and write down anything you remember then. For what it's worth, REM periods last longer closer to morning, so if you want to do anything at all differently, just wake up a little earlier than normal on occasion.

As an additional practice, you may find it helpful to re-read your recent dreams occasionally during the day, and eventually to practice remembering your dreams without re-reading them (although you should still write them down) in order to practice with your new form of memory.

Thanks for your reaction, just after 6-7 hours sleep i can write my dreams down?
and i didn't liked the method. it takes so many power to stand up many times at a night.
I'm not that experienced with lucid dreams, are these dreams where u be aware that you dreaming and can control them?
can you reach lucid dreams with writing down your dreams or something?

Thanks&Greetings JahMonk
Babylon Keep Spreading Lies, No Matter If Someone Dies.
Keep open up your eyes, Humanity have to Rise.

November 07, 2012, 12:54:33 PM
Reply #4

Iatros

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I really would just sleep as long as you normally would... get the amount of sleep that your body needs, you will dream no matter what.

As for lucid dreams, if regular dreams are experiences that you remember after you wake up, lucid dreams are dreams that you are actually awake in WHILE your body is sleeping. They can seem just as real as real life, and you can learn to control everything about your dream environment, talk to your subconscious, or even learn to have out-of-body experiences from the lucid dream, eventually. It's basically just like realizing that you are dreaming, and "waking up" in the dream without waking up your sleeping body. It's a great feeling. You can even learn to go directly into a lucid dream from being awake without first falling unconscious, although most find this difficult.

If you develop your dream memory by writing your dreams down consistently, chances are you will begin to occasionally have lucid dreams. If you'd like to speed up the process, you can get into the habit of checking to see if you are dreaming by learning certain things about the dream world which differ from real life. So for instance, in dreams many people will notice that they do not have five fingers, that mirrors don't reflect things normally, that clocks don't tell the same time twice, that things don't read the same words twice, that math doesn't work the same, that light switches don't do anything, that turning around or spinning might completely change your environment, etc.

I personally find it easiest to check my hands and make sure that I have exactly five normal fingers. Whenever something seems strange to me during the day, I make sure I have five fingers. Occasionally, I'll check my hand and have many more than five fingers, and know that I am dreaming, and become lucid. You can use whatever method you'd like, and if you do a little research you will find many different techniques for having more lucid dreams.

I am also going to tentatively say making sure you get enough vitamin B6 will likely also help you remember your dreams more vividly... High doses of B6 have been correlated with vivid dreams, so it seems only logical that sufficient B6 plays a role in the ability to remember dreams. Don't take too much, though, just make sure you are getting a healthy amount.
"And in this lies my honour and my reward, - / That whenever I come to the fountain to drink I find the living water itself thirsty; / And it drinks me while I drink it." - Almustafa