Author Topic: Official Ninjutsu Thread  (Read 75457 times)

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June 05, 2013, 12:32:45 AM
Reply #210

RanmaBushiko

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I actually read up on Ninjutsu for quite a while, and I've got multiple books on the subject, Hadouken.  I preferred Dr. Haha Lung more than Stephen K. Hayes on the subject, however.  I've got "The Ninja and Their Secret Fighting Art", "Mind Manipulation: Ancient and Modern Ninja Techniques", "Ninja Shadowhand: The Art of Invisibility", and "The Nine Halls of Death: Ninja Secrets of Mind Mastery".  I'll be sure to pick up a copy of that book when I can.

Why did I study on it?  It wasn't to try to replicate Naruto stuff, that's for sure.  (And if someone ever claims they can do a Chidori, I have my patented "Boot to the Balls no Jutsu" to use on them when they try!)  It was to study up on being stealthier, and learning, as well as practicing stealth techniques.

I've always loved to do stuff in the woods, and outdoors, and reading up on it quite well supplimented my rudimentary stealth skills I learned from an old, almost ancient book, called "Kid's Shenanigans" which had some of the best stealth tricks and tips for children and even teenagers that I've ever read to date, under it's "how to sneak around" section.

Seriously, you might want to actually check it out.  It's worded well, and points out a lot of places that noone thinks to look for someone in, with a nice basis of stealth to it.  How to hide in the streets, how to tail someone, how to watch without being caught... worded for children, but it still works for us adults, too.

I remember reading it, and then taking it's advice for a game of hide and seek, involving my family, for a babysitting job my mom was doing when I was... 16?  17?  So I hid myself behind the clothes and the vacuum cleaner in the closet, and settled back to wait for an hour.  5 different times the closet door was open, with my head right behind the vacuum cleaner handle, and five times it went shut again, because they couldn't comprehend that I was hiding back there, behind all the clothes.
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June 05, 2013, 01:11:34 AM
Reply #211

Mind_Bender

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I actually read up on Ninjutsu for quite a while, and I've got multiple books on the subject, Hadouken.  I preferred Dr. Haha Lung more than Stephen K. Hayes on the subject, however.  I've got "The Ninja and Their Secret Fighting Art", "Mind Manipulation: Ancient and Modern Ninja Techniques", "Ninja Shadowhand: The Art of Invisibility", and "The Nine Halls of Death: Ninja Secrets of Mind Mastery".  I'll be sure to pick up a copy of that book when I can.

Just to point out, Ha Ha Lung shouldn't be trusted because he has no backing. He/she just seems to read about hypnosis, NLP, self-defense books, psychology and add 'ninja' in the mix. There are no articles on the inter net or any books and magazine I have read on the martial arts that he/she and the editor practice.

Where with Hayes, sure he is a sellout, but he does have backing with Bujinkan. Not the favorite of a lot ninja enthusiasts, but it is still a genuine (I think, I have heard a lot of different things about this lineage) and you can actaully learn from Hayes himself, where Dr Laughing Lung is a pen name trying to get money off the 'secret' and 'advanced' ninja training.

Your best bet is to scour the inter net for historical accounts. Samurai literature might even mention a little about the ninja (I think Secrets of the Samurai touches upon the subject for a brief moment).
"Spirit is in a state of grace forever.
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Therefore you are in a state of grace forever."

"As relfections of the Source, we are little gods."

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June 05, 2013, 02:16:50 AM
Reply #212

RanmaBushiko

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Even still, his read up quite interesting on the basics and practice of stealth, but thanks for pointing that one out.  Didn't actually learn about that.
An old Radki user, still working to refine how it was originally taught.  I've been studying since 1998, for 15 years of the stuff.

I've worked as a mentor online on AIM and MSN for the past 10 years of that time, as well.

If you want to ask me about Astral Projection, Radki, or anything else, I'll give you advice.

June 05, 2013, 10:47:25 PM
Reply #213

HADOUKEN

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I've seen Haha Lung's stuff. Seriously not good. Everyone who sees it finds it laughable.

Stephen Hayes has some great stuff going on in "The Ninja Defense." His Ninpo Taijutsu being taught in the context of modern self defense is absolutely awesome! The ninja philosophy being applied to avoiding violence and overcoming obstacles in life are great and the martial arts within are very applicable and practical.

If espionage is more your cup of tea, "True Path of the Ninja" is one of the best books ever for that sort of thing.
Develop mind and body to enhance the spirit.

June 06, 2013, 12:12:46 AM
Reply #214

Mind_Bender

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Look up Koga Ninja on YouTube and the Israeli Officer. It's very similar to Systema in it's techniques and methods. It's like the Aikido of Military Combat.

For stealth practices there are a lot of military books from the 70's and 80's you can purchase at almost any military surplus store or even find on line for free. Like my brother tells me (that he got from an author) "If you want to be a ninja, study everything but ninjutsu." Books on hunting and outdoor survival are also very good to learn for stealth and making do with the nature that surrounds you. I shouldn't be telling you this... I think the Red Swans are close by...
"Spirit is in a state of grace forever.
Your reality is only spirit.
Therefore you are in a state of grace forever."

"As relfections of the Source, we are little gods."

"...part of me doesn't want to believe that auto-eroticism while crushing on a doodle (sigil) could manifest a check in the mail box, but hey, it did."

"Everybody laughs the same language."

June 06, 2013, 02:34:23 AM
Reply #215

RanmaBushiko

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I've seen Haha Lung's stuff. Seriously not good. Everyone who sees it finds it laughable.

Stephen Hayes has some great stuff going on in "The Ninja Defense." His Ninpo Taijutsu being taught in the context of modern self defense is absolutely awesome! The ninja philosophy being applied to avoiding violence and overcoming obstacles in life are great and the martial arts within are very applicable and practical.

If espionage is more your cup of tea, "True Path of the Ninja" is one of the best books ever for that sort of thing.

*chuckles* Good to know.  I'll keep that in mind, and yeah, I'm going to shell out the cash when I can, though it might be next month unless I earn a small bonus this month by doing a ton of extra stuff(or if I manage to sell another wand on etsy...).  More's the pity that I can rarely afford books, with my reading addiction.

Look up Koga Ninja on YouTube and the Israeli Officer. It's very similar to Systema in it's techniques and methods. It's like the Aikido of Military Combat.

For stealth practices there are a lot of military books from the 70's and 80's you can purchase at almost any military surplus store or even find on line for free. Like my brother tells me (that he got from an author) "If you want to be a ninja, study everything but ninjutsu." Books on hunting and outdoor survival are also very good to learn for stealth and making do with the nature that surrounds you. I shouldn't be telling you this... I think the Red Swans are close by...

Good to know.  Very good to know, honestly.  I got some crap camp cookware from Stansport, through a small military surplus store that's so old, my Dad visited there when he was a teenager(He's in his 60s), that I'm going to return soon, and get a refund.  Maybe they'll have some books on it.  Then again, I didn't see books the last few times I was there.  Knives, plenty.  Sleeping bags, and outdoor supplies, and even camping gear, yeah.  But no books.

Speaking of outdoor hunting and survival, you might want to look up Daniel C. Beard's stuff.  He was one of the founders of the Boy Scouts of America, and it's a real pity his stuff isn't referenced by the Boy Scouts anymore.  (Though, it's probably for a lack of common sense in little kids, but he explains a GREAT many interesting things in his books.)

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/28255 for one of his books.  You can also find The American Boy's Handy Book for free on Google if you look.  Both are quite good at explaining woodscraft, hunting, and building shelters on the extremely cheap.  Not so much on stealth, but it explains how to use underbrush to construct pretty good cabins, shelters, and the like, while that first one explains more than you'd think, for the page count.  They're all from around the 1900s, so they're a bit dated, so make sure to do things like using common sense, though.  Especially when he mentions using lead to repair plumbing, or roof problems, and using arsenic for taxidermy.
An old Radki user, still working to refine how it was originally taught.  I've been studying since 1998, for 15 years of the stuff.

I've worked as a mentor online on AIM and MSN for the past 10 years of that time, as well.

If you want to ask me about Astral Projection, Radki, or anything else, I'll give you advice.

June 06, 2013, 11:37:43 AM
Reply #216

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I'm a big fan of Stephen K. Hayes. I have a couple of his To Shin Do DVD's. Really good stuff.

He does a good job of breaking down the MECHANICS of the techniques. So rather than go through a routine, he explains WHY it works, and how you can apply it in different situations.

He also looks at modern scenarios and the situations you're most likely to have to defend yourself (even if you're not doing any physical fighting).

Regarding his lineage, many people call the Bujinkan and Hatsumi HIMSELF into question.

Regarding what "ninjutsu" encompasses, many of their fighting techniques were no different than any other fighting techniques used by "samurai"/other jujutsu schools. In fact, out of the 13 Ryu taught by the Bujinkan, I think at least 3 have a reputable history/lineage (seeing as how Hatsumi's tecaher, Toshitsugu Takamatsu, learned from multiple sources), so for the people who do support the Bujinkan and its offshoots (Hayes, Genbukan, Jinenkan, Akban, etc) from a lineage perspective (a relative minority) they do so based on those handful of Jujutsu lineages.

Of course some of those offshoots are also involved in other lineages as well further on down the line, so you know.

There are a lot of different factors at play. There's lineage, style of training, history of the teachers, metrics used to judge accomplishment, etc.
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June 06, 2013, 07:17:51 PM
Reply #217

Mind_Bender

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The Koga lineage seems to be a little more authentic in training methods and principles, at least what is taught in Japan (I'm pretty sure Genbukan is Koga, whereas Bujinkan is Iga, just to clarify).

My fathers friend is Bujinkan 4th degree black belt (Yondan) at it seems a little too easy to get ranked in Bujinkan (through DVD's- seriously?) and some of the modern practitioners don't look all that good. Hayes is the exception, he actually makes the techniques look good and he portrays someone that has a real martial spirit and technique. The old videos from the 80's and early 90's of Bujinkan, those seemed more authentic ninjutsu training because they were outdoors, climbing trees, hitting trees, using nature as cover, etc. I think Bujinkan has become more of a business, that's why I am not a big supporter of it and would rather learn 'ninjutsu' like I do magic- a little bit of flavor from the best martial, mental and sociological arts.
"Spirit is in a state of grace forever.
Your reality is only spirit.
Therefore you are in a state of grace forever."

"As relfections of the Source, we are little gods."

"...part of me doesn't want to believe that auto-eroticism while crushing on a doodle (sigil) could manifest a check in the mail box, but hey, it did."

"Everybody laughs the same language."

June 08, 2013, 12:42:26 AM
Reply #218

HADOUKEN

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The Koga lineage seems to be a little more authentic in training methods and principles, at least what is taught in Japan (I'm pretty sure Genbukan is Koga, whereas Bujinkan is Iga, just to clarify).

Nope. Genbukan is an offshoot of Bujinkan. For Koga Ninjutsu, you have to look to Jinichi Kawakami and his Ban Family style of Ninjutsu.

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My fathers friend is Bujinkan 4th degree black belt (Yondan) at it seems a little too easy to get ranked in Bujinkan (through DVD's- seriously?) and some of the modern practitioners don't look all that good. Hayes is the exception, he actually makes the techniques look good and he portrays someone that has a real martial spirit and technique. The old videos from the 80's and early 90's of Bujinkan, those seemed more authentic ninjutsu training because they were outdoors, climbing trees, hitting trees, using nature as cover, etc. I think Bujinkan has become more of a business, that's why I am not a big supporter of it and would rather learn 'ninjutsu' like I do magic- a little bit of flavor from the best martial, mental and sociological arts.

Hayes is not Bujinkan anymore, though he still in regular contact with Hatsumi. As for why Hayes is sort of doing his own thing now, part of it was Hatsumi's original mission to international teachers to create a teaching vehicle relevant to the countries they were teaching in. That's how organizations like SKH Quest and AKBAN were formed. Another part of it has a bit to do with what you, and many others, have noticed about what modern Ninjutsu largely looks like compared to how it looked in the 1970s and 1980s.
Develop mind and body to enhance the spirit.