Author Topic: Lack of Dreams  (Read 3812 times)

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April 01, 2004, 01:19:21 PM
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LoneGypsy

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Hello, this is my first post on Veritas.. I've been here for a decent amount of time, but something has been bothering me as of late...

As a child I use to get very vivid dreams and nightmares that use to be symbolic of things that came in the future. However, now I can't recall any of my dreams. Well, occasionally one or two a year. I was hoping that maybe someone may have any information about how to recall dreams.
"The most horrifying idea is that what we believe with all our hearts is not necessarily the truth." -Elizabeth Loftus

April 01, 2004, 03:32:35 PM
Reply #1

Alex

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Every child has vivid dreams but now...maybe it's just some kind of "phase".  Usually I can't remember dreams for a week or two, but never for a whole year.  So I'm not exact on this.  Maybe you should try not to move after you wake up and concentrate on any dreams you could of had or just on dreams themselves.  That usually works.  But it might not for your case.

April 01, 2004, 05:31:29 PM
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Lallander

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One of the best ways to remember your dreams, and to help build up that memory, is to  keep a dream journal. Every morning when you wake up take down anything you can remember. Sketch, write, use a micro-cassette recorder. Whatever will help you get it down. After a while of this you'll start having more vivid memories of your dreams.

April 01, 2004, 06:08:43 PM
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Cogito

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Well this might sound unhealthy, but just put your alarm clock to wake you up in the middle of the night. If you wake up *while* you are dreaming, you will interrupt the dream, but at least you will have more chance of remembering it. This always worked for me, but if I don't write it down *immediately* I forget MANY details that might be important.

If you read up on REM cycles etc. you can _kind of_ calculate when you are dreaming, and when you are just in dream-less sleep, so you know at what time to set your alarm clock.

Also, what Lallander said, once you *actually* start remembering dreams, write them down in a journal. Keep a nice book and pen next to your bed so you don't have to get out of bed to write down a dream.

I used to have very little dreams, once a month or so, I wrote all my dreams down for 3~4 months (like 3 months ago), and now I have dreams *every single day*. And they're vivid too, it's driving me crazy. I now only write down those that seem/feel important.

April 01, 2004, 07:24:40 PM
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LoneGypsy

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Yeah, that's a good idea... though I'd only be able to manage it during the weekends cuz I wouldn't remember to wake up for school. *grins* A few years ago I actually started a dream journal during the odd dreams I got... (one of them was symbolic for something I found out about later). However, the second day in I had lost most of the dreams...
"The most horrifying idea is that what we believe with all our hearts is not necessarily the truth." -Elizabeth Loftus

April 02, 2004, 03:05:09 AM
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Lallander

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The point isn't that you'll remember everything at first.
If you keep up with it, thats when you'll see results.

April 02, 2004, 02:32:30 PM
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LoneGypsy

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Oh, I know what you mean. However, I can't keep up with a dream journal if I don't remember anything when I first wake up. In fact, I do keep a one, but I think I have a max of three entries in it... it has helped me remember those dreams that I recalled when I first woke, but that was and still is rare.
"The most horrifying idea is that what we believe with all our hearts is not necessarily the truth." -Elizabeth Loftus

April 03, 2004, 12:41:47 AM
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Syko Dragon

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One tip that my old Psychology teacher gave us about the journal was to not make it exclusively just for dreams.  Make it a journal by itself.  That is, if you make it for dreams at first, but don't ever start to remember any part of them, you'll stay stuck at the same place you left off at.

So, to help kick-start that memory of yours, you need to write a minimum of 3 pages (the journal doesn't have to be a big 8X11 journal, even if that's optimal, but don't make it really, really small).  The idea behind this, is that if you just keep writing down your thoughts upon waking up (anything and everything).  From there, if you get lost before 3 pages is up, just keep pushing to finish it everyday.  In that way, it forces your mind to think in different ways.

One other thing to remember is that you shouldn't leave sections unfinished...meaning, if another idea comes up (even if it is a dream), make a note of it (of what you remembered) on the side with a star, and finish what you're writing first, then go back to that idea.



I hope this helped a bit.  I wouldn't really recommend putting your alarm in the middle of the night.  Many times, when I get woken up in the middle of the night, I'm just pissed and tired, so I go back to sleep...many times, I don't even remember waking up and talking to anybody or turning off any alarms...but more importantly, it could start to train you to have broken sleep and wake up in the middle of the night all the time.

Good luck training.  Until we meet again...
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April 04, 2004, 07:38:06 PM
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LoneGypsy

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*grins* well, a midnight wake can always be entertaining... thanks for the advice about a daily journal. I'll certainly try. Maybe I'll have more luck than I did when I was younger. Afterall, what ten year old really keeps up with a diary?*smiles*
"The most horrifying idea is that what we believe with all our hearts is not necessarily the truth." -Elizabeth Loftus

April 08, 2004, 09:31:45 PM
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solstice

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Try meditating, before you go to bed.
One reason people say they dont dream, is because they are overstimulated and dont take time to wind-down, before sleeping.
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April 13, 2004, 03:03:08 PM
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Caine

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Just a simple question.  Is it normal to go about 6 months without having a single dream you can remember or have a dream in which things happen?  I'm talking like you go to sleep and then you wake up to the blaring noise to your alarm clock and that is it, for 6 months.

April 13, 2004, 07:43:53 PM
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Lallander

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Normal? Sadly its becoming more so all the time.
Our society sucks in that regard.
Healthy? No. Id really look into stress relief techniques or something.

April 13, 2004, 09:49:15 PM
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ChezNips

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Actually that is extremely normal but it doesnt mean you aren't dreaming.  You just aren't remembering them and a blaring alarm clock has a way of making you wake up in a hurry and zapping the dream memories fast according to the dream clinic I attended many years ago.  The key to remembering dreams is to give yourself an auto suggestion to rememer dreams when you wake and then to wake slowly repeating the basic premis of the dream to yourself to cue other dream memories.  Another great tool was to drink one or more glasses of water before going to sleep so when you have to use the bathroom at night, you can record your dreams, go back to sleep and then wake and record more.
some days you're the bug, some days you're the windshield.

April 13, 2004, 09:53:08 PM
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ChezNips

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I've collected links on a lot of subjects and there are some really good ones on dreaming here: http://cheznips.psipalatium.com/dreams.html
some days you're the bug, some days you're the windshield.

April 16, 2004, 11:27:37 AM
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Faijer

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I heard that you are only supposed to remember 2 dreams if at all per night. The one when you begin sleeping, and the one when your sleeping ends. I believe due to my own personal experience, that the latter is more common, I usually tend to wake up from a dream, not enter one from consciousness. So perhaps external sources of awakening don't allow that last dream to take place, because that dream is only destined to happen say, a few minutes before your body clock wakes you up (which is presumably set by your body upon entering sleep and determined by fatigue, stress etc). If this is true, perhaps the lack of dreams could be being caused by a lack of sleep.
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