Author Topic: Components of Creative Visualization  (Read 3847 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

July 11, 2007, 09:58:28 AM
Read 3847 times

ChezNips

  • Teacher Emeritus
  • Posts By Osmosis

  • Offline
  • *****
  • Veritas Teacher

  • 1722
  • Karma:
    7
    • View Profile
Creative Visualization encompasses 5 essential components: imagination, focus, belief, consciousness, and affirmation. Let's break each component down to define them.

Imagination

Imagination is the most essential component and the one that you naturally always have on hand. With creative visualization, you begin with an idea and create a mental picture around it. This mental picture is created by drawing on past experiences, using small elements to create a new picture. Your imagination takes you beyond the limitations of your everyday mind to the place of new possibilities. Some people have difficulty with creating mental pictures but I believe they make it harder then it has to be and that creates a blockage, in a sense a negative affirmation that they cannot do something. If you are asked to close your eyes and visualize you are in a dense forest and to hear the sound of the birds, the rush of wind, the musky odor of the foliage and see the sunlight filtering down through the trees. Most people can do this even if they have never been to a forest by drawing mental pictures from the media, perhaps a movie to create a new scene. With a little work, it can be easily achieved.

Focus

You must relax into a quiet, meditative mind to cultivate focus. This creates the necessary state of mind in which you can begin to fill in the details of your vision. It also creates the all important intention that you will bring to your vision into focus. To develop your vision, you are giving it positive energy and this quiet meditative state serves to sharpen that focus.

Belief

Once your vision is created, you need to act as if what you envisioned has already happened. Don't just hope it will. You must believe it will happen with the conviction as if there is never any question or doubt. You take the belief that it will happen and you direct your meditative focus to expand the feeling of how possible what you envision is. You direct your focus to what it feels like to experience your vision as if it were already happening. How might you do this? Think of how it will feel when it happens, create those thoughts, ideas, actions and reactions.

Consciousness

Once you have begun the process of visioning and focusing on your goal, you continue to remain conscious. You continue to be aware of feelings, expectations and doubts that surface. You will keep clarifying your desire and intention through consciousness.

Affirmation

Affirmation is a vital technique in creative visualization. It is to declare positively or to make valid in affirming and continuing to support the original vision or intention. In a nutshell, it means to make firm. When you use the affirmation in creative visualization, you are making the image you have created firm with reinforcement. Shakti Gawain defined an affirmation as a "strong, positive statement that something is already done. It should be simple and short, but it can leave drastic results if used with the other techniques.
some days you're the bug, some days you're the windshield.

July 11, 2007, 10:49:36 AM
Reply #1

ChezNips

  • Teacher Emeritus
  • Posts By Osmosis

  • Offline
  • *****
  • Veritas Teacher

  • 1722
  • Karma:
    7
    • View Profile
 Self-Actualization 
 
If we intend to use our spiritual self-knowledge as a part of learning creative visualization, we must learn to understand ourselves on every level- physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual. This understanding of the self is vital to getting clear on your dreams and desires, to defining your goals both short and long term because it shows us what areas to invest time, energy and focus.

Introspection is a great tool that may seem unnatural at first because it is spending time noticing our thoughts and feelings. You can start by noticing your reactions in certain situations. Take an outside look at your body language, what you are saying and how it matches or doesn't match with how you think. Introspection is essentially examining what dominates your thoughts, your attitudes about yourself, others and the world and examination of what you really want and why you want it. When you commit to more introspection in your life, you acknowledge the power of your thoughts. We may believe that what we think but do not verbalize is not important but it is actually the opposite of the truth that I hope to show you throughout this series.

Humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow identified a concept he called self-actualization. He identified this concept as the want to continue learning all of an individual's life. They want fulfillment and harmony for themselves and they want to contribute positive energy to the rest of the world. Along with this concept, he defined a hierarchy of needs for each individual using a pyramid as a symbol of how the individual progresses through each need. The bottom of the pyramid and the biggest "slice" are the physiological needs as pure survival. When those needs are met, the individual progresses to safety needs. Those would include the knowledge that they are sheltered, protected from war, disease or financial instability. The next level up the pyramid would be the need to belong and to know that they are loved. The next stage up the pyramid is prestige and self-esteem and at the very top of the pyramid is self-actualization. This is the "be all you can be" area.

Self-actualization is about creating what you want in your life and it takes a great deal of time, dedication and work- and don't forget introspection! Creative visualization is one of the most powerful ways in which we can use our imagination, introspection, and dedication to move toward self-actualization.
 
some days you're the bug, some days you're the windshield.