Author Topic: Learning a new Martial Art via Internet - Possible?  (Read 4966 times)

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September 04, 2013, 04:29:54 PM
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Aviad

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Hey guys, I'm training something like 2.5 years in MMA, I'm learning Jiu-Jitsu Brazzile, Muay Thai, and Judo.
I thought to myself maybe I can start learning a self-defence Martial Art, specially unarmed techniques, from standing.
since I am already training in MMA, I can't go to another club, so, can I learn a new Martial Art via the Internet? vidoes, articles, guides, etc.
Is it possible? Thanks for assitants.

September 04, 2013, 04:58:51 PM
Reply #1

Mind_Bender

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If you understand and can apply proper principles of body alignment, movement, breath, balance of relaxation and power it's pretty easy to learn a new art from books and other non-human media, unless it's an internal art- it's safest to have a properly trained master guide you. If you have a partner for two person sets, all the better.
"Spirit is in a state of grace forever.
Your reality is only spirit.
Therefore you are in a state of grace forever."

"As relfections of the Source, we are little gods."

"...part of me doesn't want to believe that auto-eroticism while crushing on a doodle (sigil) could manifest a check in the mail box, but hey, it did."

"Everybody laughs the same language."

September 04, 2013, 05:38:53 PM
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Steve

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I'm confused on something: why can't you go to another club when you're practicing MMA?

MMA is supposed to stand for Mixed martial arts, and in order to mix you need to learn multiple martial arts, so what's stopping you from going to other clubs to learn more martial arts? I'd understand if it's a cash thing or if there's no other clubs around, but since you said it directly after "I am already training in MMA" it makes me wonder if you current club are elitist and would kick you out if you went to another club?

Other than that, yes, you can learn the generalities of martial arts from books, online, videos, etc. Specifics of any art and fine-turned corrections to mechanics would have to come from a human source that's already well-learnt in the art, though. Just need to find the information on the generalities ^_^

~Steve
Mastery does not occur when you've performed a feat once or twice. Instead, it comes after years of training, when you realize that you no longer notice when you're performing a feat which used to require so much effort. Even walking takes years of training for a human: why not everything else?

September 05, 2013, 01:07:25 AM
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Aviad

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I'm confused on something: why can't you go to another club when you're practicing MMA?

MMA is supposed to stand for Mixed martial arts, and in order to mix you need to learn multiple martial arts, so what's stopping you from going to other clubs to learn more martial arts? I'd understand if it's a cash thing or if there's no other clubs around, but since you said it directly after "I am already training in MMA" it makes me wonder if you current club are elitist and would kick you out if you went to another club?

Other than that, yes, you can learn the generalities of martial arts from books, online, videos, etc. Specifics of any art and fine-turned corrections to mechanics would have to come from a human source that's already well-learnt in the art, though. Just need to find the information on the generalities ^_^

~Steve
Hey! Thanks for your reply!
I can't go to another club because It's cost alot, and maybe I'll quit from the MMA and go to another Martial Art, can you suggest me which Martial-Art go for Self-Defence?
If you understand and can apply proper principles of body alignment, movement, breath, balance of relaxation and power it's pretty easy to learn a new art from books and other non-human media, unless it's an internal art- it's safest to have a properly trained master guide you. If you have a partner for two person sets, all the better.

I believe that my MMA experience allow me to learn a new movements via vidoes, I just need to know: Which Martial Art and source should I learn/and learn from..

September 05, 2013, 02:38:32 AM
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Mind_Bender

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It depends on the type of defensive skill you want. With your MMA you should already be able to knock someone out or submit them if need be. If you apply self defense principles to your current training you don't need to learn a new system. Instead of having the mindset of competition have the mindset of life or death and train accordingly (safety first, of course). Killing intent, the will to survive, and precise, ruthless action is the mindset you need for self-defense, even you use soft arts (or until you become a master).

If you are just looking for a new art, then ignore what I just said.

Krav Maga, Systema or any combat tactic class would be best for real life self defense, especially when it comes to guns and other weapons one my might come across on the battle field or streets. Stay away from traditonal arts for self defense unless you are willing to put in the years of dedication to mastering the principles and techniques.
"Spirit is in a state of grace forever.
Your reality is only spirit.
Therefore you are in a state of grace forever."

"As relfections of the Source, we are little gods."

"...part of me doesn't want to believe that auto-eroticism while crushing on a doodle (sigil) could manifest a check in the mail box, but hey, it did."

"Everybody laughs the same language."

September 05, 2013, 05:08:52 AM
Reply #5

Aviad

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It depends on the type of defensive skill you want. With your MMA you should already be able to knock someone out or submit them if need be. If you apply self defense principles to your current training you don't need to learn a new system. Instead of having the mindset of competition have the mindset of life or death and train accordingly (safety first, of course). Killing intent, the will to survive, and precise, ruthless action is the mindset you need for self-defense, even you use soft arts (or until you become a master).

If you are just looking for a new art, then ignore what I just said.

Krav Maga, Systema or any combat tactic class would be best for real life self defense, especially when it comes to guns and other weapons one my might come across on the battle field or streets. Stay away from traditonal arts for self defense unless you are willing to put in the years of dedication to mastering the principles and techniques.
I can do all what you wrote, but there alot of kids in MMA, so they know how to defend my attacks, I can go to Krav Maga, but can I learn Krav-Maga via vidoes and books?
I'm more worried about the unarmed fights..

September 05, 2013, 11:32:41 AM
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Mars

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I'm currently doing ITF- Taekwondo (Black Belt 1st Dan) and Wing Chun (Just started), mixed in with a bit of boxing I have found relatively good for what I need to know BUT also  I have found Wing Chun, JKD and Tai-Chi lessons online on youtube channel of master wong, of course you will have to adapt them with common sense, and you will most definitely need a partner or friend to practice the moves with to properly apply them you can learn quite good methods from his videos. He does apply some of his forms and methods on his channel, if you go rooting through you will find his opinions on whats useful.

LINK
http://www.youtube.com/user/138mws?feature=watch
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8w9tKNWIqyM (Lesson one of Wing Chun, start from the basics ;p )

Note he also teaches tai - chi and other things to add in there. Is a bit of a crazy character, some of his stuff is not helpful but lessons can be taken from everywhere.


I know its not exactly what you asked for but I hope it may help :)
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 11:49:47 AM by Mars »
Experience: that most brutal of teachers. But you learn, my God do you learn. -CS Lewis
Cultivation to the mind is as necessary as food to the body. - Marcus T Cicero

September 05, 2013, 03:20:17 PM
Reply #7

Mind_Bender

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Master Wong is great. I followed his Wing Chun videos for several months and learned quite a bit. He has a good gradient of teaching.

If you have a partner that matches or exceeds your skill you can learn the applications of Krav Maga pretty easily.

Look up Vladmir Vasiliev and Mikhail Ryabko for Systema. It's a very interesting system. It applies would be advanced internal arts and pressure point martial applications in a very simple way. Systema is the Russian Special Forces empty hand combat system.

Go to the martial arts section of the forum and you will find a youtube link to a system called ACT (Applied Combat Tactics) that simplifies the the practical applications of internal martial arts for self defense and police-military personnel.
"Spirit is in a state of grace forever.
Your reality is only spirit.
Therefore you are in a state of grace forever."

"As relfections of the Source, we are little gods."

"...part of me doesn't want to believe that auto-eroticism while crushing on a doodle (sigil) could manifest a check in the mail box, but hey, it did."

"Everybody laughs the same language."

September 05, 2013, 05:28:53 PM
Reply #8

Steve

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For historical accuracy, there are no "self-defense martial arts". There are martial arts, and there are fighting styles, and there are martial arts that have degenerated into mere exercise at various dojos. But martial arts are the arts of war, and war necessarily comprises both offense and defense (how can a person honestly learn how to defend them self if they don't understand how they can be earnestly attacked? You have to learn how to effectively attack people, and then learn how to effectively protect yourself, and then learn how to bypass the defenses and then come up with more defenses, and the cycle continues ad infinitum).

Any martial art that has a history of having been used in actual warfare would be a good style to learn. So the biggest limiting factor is actually the dojo instructor. There are a lot of bad instructors out there, either because they don't know what they are doing, or because they do know what they are doing but they sadly don't know how to properly teach it. If you can't find a good instructor who knows how to teach a proper martial art, then I would err towards ... well, actually I'd suggest you stay with the MMA gym because you said you wanted to learn how to defend yourself.

I hate "MMA" because I don't view it as real martial arts, but I do acknowledge it teaches people how to beat other people up, and how to take some hits, and how to dodge some hits, and how to fight on the ground, which are all important aspects of fighting for your defense and the defense of others. One thing that it lacks, and which honestly most other modern martial arts lack, and that you'll have to make up for one your own or elsewhere, is fighting against multiple opponents. This is an important aspect of street fighting, even if you're only trying to defend, yet so few places (at least around me) seem to even touch the subject.

On the other hand, if you're really jonesin' to learn some traditional martial arts, then I would suggest books on Karate, Tae Kwon Doe, and Tai Chi Chuan (library memberships are cheap!). The first two are simple enough, and the third one is about as traditional as it comes. You won't learn anything even moderately advanced in any books, but you'll be able to learn the basics enough to be able to figure out which ones appeal to you and which ones you might want to check out further. I suggest these three for the basic foundations of many martial arts, something that MMA seems to tend to skip over.

And finally, if there are different types of dojos in your area, most good places will let random people come in and watch a session or two. Just walk in, and stand around by the door until someone comes to talk to you, and let them know what you're looking for. They will likely try to sell you on their dojo, so listen patiently and ask any every question you have but don't buy in until you've had a chance to check out a few, and even then don't buy into any of them if none of them seem good enough :) Or, maybe, buy into the cheapest for a couple of months just for the extra dojo experience.

~Steve
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 05:36:48 PM by Steve »
Mastery does not occur when you've performed a feat once or twice. Instead, it comes after years of training, when you realize that you no longer notice when you're performing a feat which used to require so much effort. Even walking takes years of training for a human: why not everything else?

January 30, 2017, 10:36:57 AM
Reply #9

TheAghora

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Yes, it is possible to learn it. To learn it right? Still possible, but less likely.

I practice Lu Shi Xin Yi Liu He, as taught my Yu Hua Long to my teacher. So I'm a 3rd generation student. Now, if I showed you a form, or your saw it on Youtube. Lets say, Dragon Hangs Shoulders, one of the "old three", and one of the first few animal forms taught. You might notice that it's an elbow strike. But you might not notice that it's a block with the arm coming out, a shield with the forearm, and a strike with the elbow, and that the first arm turning around can also be a block, grab, or strike as well. This is the most basic of the form, not the internal aspect.

Now, the footwork isn't the easiest to get down, but you could learn that on your own, but would you understand why you are doing what you're doing? The back foot is lifted, with pressure on the K1 point on the foot, because this form is also a Kidney Qi Gong. If you don't press on this point, you also lose part of the form. When the hands rotate around in this form, the back hand smacks the kidneys, giving a gentle massage to the kidneys, covering the mingmen, and protecting the back while the front hand strikes. Also, when the hand is on the back and the front arm is striking as an elbow, the back hand traditionally would grab a dagger or short blade, right after the hand smacks the back.

While you block the one attack, I'm grabbing a knife to stab you. In Gong Fu, one hand lies while the other tells the truth. This is a very old saying, and it's true. Though most of this that goes on in the form isn't something you would notice. Other forms are even more complicated. Bear Scratches looks like it could be used for some Chin Na and Trapping, an elbow strike and a back fist type movement, and it can. Though at the same time, it's our equivalent of Silk Reeling. To understand the movement and how to do it correctly, it would be quite difficult to understand from a book or video. You can get the external shapes close, maybe even perfect. But you would probably still need some critiquing.